York Golf Centre

Golf Lessons at York Golf Centre

About York Golf Centre

Golf Lessons at York Golf Centre

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit York Golf Centre for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

York Golf Centre

We have worked extremely hard in order to establish a well respected name and reputation. Much of our clientele comes from word of mouth as satisfied customers tell others and first time clients become repeat customers.The course is ideal for beginners, golf societies, ladies and those wanting a shorter course on which to play. We welcome visitors to York.

York Golf Centre

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

The lag-putt drills in section 13.2 can take care of your three-putt problems specifically (1) Stepping Off Distances (page 304); (2) the Triangle Drill (page 306); (3) Edge-of-Green Drill (page 306); (4) Playing Draw-Back for putts over 35 feet (page 307); (5) Chiputting (page 309); and (6) Playing the Phony-Hole Drill over level changes (page 311). If you spend enough practice time playing or executing these drills 1 assure you this will at least minimize and maybe even eliminate your three-putt problem.

14.3 Putting from Off the Green

This is a problem for many golfers because they don’t have a rule to follow. My basic rule for whether or not to putt from the fringe is: Putt if there is no reason not to.

This is not a question about distance from the edge of the green or distance to the pin. It is a question of good lies and smooth rolls. For example if you are playing Augusta National in The Masters or Pinehurst No. 2 in the U.S. Open you can depend on your ball rolling smoothly through the approaches and fringes around the greens. Courses like these have the best maintenance crews who take loving care of the green sites so you can putt from many positions around the greens and be sure of good results.

On most courses the first three feet of fringe is usually safe for putting. After that it becomes questionable. If your lie is good and the fairway between your ball and the green is smooth the chiputt technique works well from off the green (putters usually have two or three degrees of loft so they perform almost like the old chipping irons from good lies in the fairway or fringe). When there’s a steep bank in the way l recommend putting if at all possible; chipping or pitching into banks where incoming impact and bounce angles should be considered is far more difficult.

However never putt from a bad lie. If your ball is in high grass or any position where blades of grass will get between your putterface and the ball at impact don’t use your putter (Figure 14.3.1). If your ball is sitting down in a depression bare spot or pocket of any kind don’t use your putter. If the grass is high anywhere be tween your ball and where you want it to roll – and you have the option of pitch ing (flying) it over the grass – don’t putt it. Assume that if your ball can get hung up rolling through such tall grass it probably will. (Consider that Pelz’s Corollary to Murphy’s Law.)

York Golf Centre

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The Hit Stroke

Let me explain what this “dead-hands” stroke is not. It is not your natural stroke because most golfers’ natural instinct is to “hit” a putt with the muscles of the fingers hands and wrists. Our instincts are developed in our childhood when we play games that involve hitting things turning knobs and manipulating pushing and controlling the objects in our lives with our fingers hands and wrists. This also is the way most people putt because they consider it to be natural. But just because it’s natural does not make it either the right way or the best way.

But golfers hit their putts (Figure 5.3.1). And when a ball is hit the distance it rolls depends on how hard it is hit. The power of the putt depends on the energy or effort put into the stroke. And therein lies the problem: You can’t see or feel the power of a hit before it happens. No matter how much a golfer practices hitting putts the right distance and speed when he or she gets under pressure and tries to apply the same hit to the ball with adrenaline-filled muscles the results will be wrong. Once again as the muscles get stronger the same feel that produced good results in practice produces a more powerful hit under pressure.

Many low-handicap amateurs fall into this trap. They practice with the belief that the harder and longer they work the better they’ll putt under pressure. They believe that putting well under pressure involves courage strength of conviction or some other inner quality of the heart. I suppose these character traits are admirable but they have nothing to do with how far the ball rolls in good putting. If you insist on hitting your putts and controlling your putt distance with your muscles then the only way to practice feel and touch is under pressure. The good player can accomplish this by playing in tournaments in which he is likely to face many pressure putts. Do enough of that – and enough is a lot – and you begin preparing yourself for future pressure situations. Higher-handicap golfers have a slightly different problem. Because hitting

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 117 with the hands is the natural way to putt most golfers begin by doing just that. The results won’t be very good but because the golfer is still new to the game poor putting will seem acceptable. It’s later as these golfers improve their ball-striking and short games and work on bringing their handicaps down that their natural (hand-muscle-controlled) putting stroke limits their ability to score.

The Amateurs Proved It

Let me give you one more problem with “hitting” your putts: It’s an inaccurate way to control the power transmitted to the ball. We measured this (Figure 5.3.2) when we tested the putting strokes of some 150 amateurs at the DuPont World Amateur tournament by measuring the length of their strokes when they putted. The averaged results show (Figure 5.3.3) that the length of their backswings varied only about 6 inches while the length of the putts produced varied from 6 to 30 feet (on a flat putting surface of 9.0 green speed). This means their backswing the power generator of the pulling stroke varied only 6 inches for 24 feet or about one-quarter inch per foot.

York Golf Centre

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition York Golf Centre

Here is a picture at full speed. The wrists have completed their roll through the ball. The left elbow is close to the body, and about ready to break, allowing for follow through.Now, I’ll take you into the follow-through. This will be simple. Basically just keep turning around your spine. If you have flipped your wrists correctly, you won’t have to bother too much with the follow through. However, there is a basic position that you should be in when you finish the swing. You should be facing the target, and your right and left forearms should be crossed. Your right forearm should be closest to you, and the club should be out towards left field.

York Golf Centre