Strawberry Hill Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Strawberry Hill Golf Club

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Golf Lessons at Strawberry Hill Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Strawberry Hill Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Strawberry Hill Golf Club

With one par 5 and only three par 4 holes the 9 hole course may not be difficult from a length perspective, but each hole has been designed to provide other challenges. The brook crosses 8 holes, there are many bunkers, and the fairways are narrow requiring accuracy to keep out of trouble.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

But remember as discussed in section 4.4 aim is not just a function of eyesight. Rather it is primarily a learned response to the way you miss. If you usually miss to the left your subconscious will get you to aim farther to the right. If you usually miss to the right your subconscious will aim you to the left to compensate.

I learned early in my teaching career that I could never successfully change a golfer’s stroke compensation to pull putts to the left if I allowed him to keep aiming to the right. Of course the opposite is also true.

Which raises the “chicken or the egg” question: Which comes first missing to the left or aiming to the right? Well I’m going to give you the “chicken or the egg” answer: I don’t know. But more important it doesn’t matter and golfers shouldn’t care. Whichever came first the other is always there. If you correct one fault but leave the other in place the correction will soon disappear. To improve you must always correct two things the mistake and its compensation (correct only one thing and you ‘ll probably putt worse).

In our schools we have learned that the most efficient way a golfer can learn proper aim is to separate how it is learned from his stroke results. It usually takes three to six weeks of nightly practice with a feedback device. You can’t do this outdoors putting on a real green because there is no feedback on proper aim there (whether a putt goes in or not doesn’t show you where you aimed). In fact it’s possible to putt for the rest of your life on a putting green and never improve your aim.

The “LazrAimer”

The most efficient way to teach your brain what perfect putter alignment looks like (that is when the putterface is perfectly aligned to your Aimline) is with a device called the LazrAimer (Figure 11.7.1). We use this device with every student in our three-day schools to measure their ability to aim and teach them how to improve this ability. The LazrAimer actually doubles the visible manifestation of the mistake (Figure 11.7.2) which is good because after practicing with it for a while and beginning to improve it points out the remaining errors no matter how small. Although three days of practice is not enough to learn to aim well it gives students a start and makes them very aware of the problem. By the time they leave us they know that if they don’t learn to aim properly any work they do to improve their strokes will probably he wasted.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The pop stroke does have one advantage and that is it keeps the putterface angle essentially square at all times which is a good thing. However it uses the muscles of the hands and arms for power and is therefore a difficult method to use if you want to develop really good touch.

One of the more interesting putting techniques in golf history is the so-called “hook stroke” of the great South African Bobby Locke who won more than 80 tournaments worldwide between the 1930s and ’50s including four British Opens. Many golfers have told me that Locke put hook spin on his putts which made them dive into the hole. That may have been what both they and Locke thought but I’m sure it was not the case.

I’ve seen photographs of Locke from which 1 can imagine that his stroke traveled on an in-to-out path with the putterface slightly closed through impact (Fig

Methods of Putting 45 ure 3.5.5). Such a stroke motion would make one think he was trying to hook puns and he may have actually put a very small amount of initial hook spin on his longer putts (his stroke proved both very consistent and very successful – Locke’s putting prowess was legendary). But I’m sure his putts were not spinning to the left or downward when they found the hole. They rolled in just like other golfers’ putts except they may have done so more consistently than any other player of his time. (In section 4.9 you’ll learn that the surface of the green takes all the spin off a putt within the first 20 percent of its roll.)

Bobby Locke was a great putter but his putts did not hook into the hole. preparing to roll a putt.

The Cut Stroke

While there’s no such thing as hooking putts it is possible to cut across the path of one’s putts which is precisely what Chi Chi Rodriguez did while winning more than 30 tournaments in his career. Chi Chi actually putted fairly well in the early years of his career consistently cutting across the ball by swinging the putterhead outside-to-inside across the line (Figure 3.5.6). But his putting failed him later on because a cut stroke makes putting more complex than it needs to be.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Strawberry Hill Golf Club

The wrists have completed their roll, and the left elbow is close the body.Swinging around the spine. The wrists have completed the roll and now the forearms are crossing. The follow through is almost complete. If you notice, the triangle is still in place, proving that you are connected throughout the entire swing.

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