Rye Hill Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Rye Hill Golf Club

About Rye Hill Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Rye Hill Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Rye Hill Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Rye Hill Golf Club

At Rye Hill you will find a warm welcome for members, guests and visitors. Located in North Oxfordshire, set in 200 acres of rolling countryside, with dramatic lakes and both park and heath land features, it’s a hidden haven. Just 6 miles from Banbury and junction 11 of the M40, Rye Hill offers a championship course, practice area and a magnificent golf shop.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Next down the easiness scale comes the “pop stroke ” which was used quite successfully by both Gary Player and Johnny Miller early in their careers. The backstroke is shorter than normal and there’s virtually no follow-through after impact so the ball is “popped ” or jabbed forward (Figure 3.5.4). Neither Miller nor Player stuck with the pop stroke through his career because they said it lacked consistency; when I’ve asked them about this method neither would recommend it. However both won many tournaments popping their putts so it may not be as bad as they recall.

The pop stroke does have one advantage and that is it keeps the putterface angle essentially square at all times which is a good thing. However it uses the muscles of the hands and arms for power and is therefore a difficult method to use if you want to develop really good touch.

One of the more interesting putting techniques in golf history is the so-called “hook stroke” of the great South African Bobby Locke who won more than 80 tournaments worldwide between the 1930s and ’50s including four British Opens. Many golfers have told me that Locke put hook spin on his putts which made them dive into the hole. That may have been what both they and Locke thought but I’m sure it was not the case.

I’ve seen photographs of Locke from which 1 can imagine that his stroke traveled on an in-to-out path with the putterface slightly closed through impact (Fig

Methods of Putting 45 ure 3.5.5). Such a stroke motion would make one think he was trying to hook puns and he may have actually put a very small amount of initial hook spin on his longer putts (his stroke proved both very consistent and very successful – Locke’s putting prowess was legendary). But I’m sure his putts were not spinning to the left or downward when they found the hole. They rolled in just like other golfers’ putts except they may have done so more consistently than any other player of his time. (In section 4.9 you’ll learn that the surface of the green takes all the spin off a putt within the first 20 percent of its roll.)

Bobby Locke was a great putter but his putts did not hook into the hole. preparing to roll a putt.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

You can practice putting this way for years and as long as you putt on the course exactly the way you do in practice – relaxed and calm – things will be reasonably okay. But wait until you get really excited. When your heart begins to beat faster because a putt really matters your body naturally produces adrenaline which makes all of your muscles stronger. Then all your practice goes out the window because the muscles that control your putting power are now stronger than they ever were on the putting green. Even if your stroke feels the way it did in practice the adrenaline-induced extra power will cause it to provide the wrong amount of energy to your putts and produce bad results on the course.

You Can’t Avoid Adrenaline Everybody gets to experience excitement and adrenaline in golf. It’s part of why we love the game and if you want to become a better player you must learn to deal with it. You must learn to play well when adrenaline is in your system. This is easy in the power game when you want to hit the ball as far you can with whatever club is in your hands. Adrenaline in your system helps you to do this. But putting is altogether different. You can’t take one less club on the green when you’re pumped up. And you certainly don ‘t want to putt the ball as far as you can.

Luckily there is a simple way to control adrenaline when putting. Learn to putt

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 69 in such a way that the adrenaline-affected muscles of your fingers hands and wrists don’t control how far or fast your putts roll. You’ll learn about that in section 13.5.

Forearm Rotation

Just about every shot in golf except putting requires rotation of the forearms through the impact zone. But apply that same rotation to your putting stroke and you’ll produce double trouble. First your putterface will rotate from open to closed so the likelihood that it is square at the moment of impact becomes very small. Second forearm rotation supplies unwanted and unnecessary power and usually a lot of it.

But there’s yet another problem with forearm rotation: it feels natural. Even Tour professionals don’t realize they’re doing it and when I tell them to stop they usually say “What do you mean I’m not rotating my arms! ” But of course they are. And like the pros most golfers don’ t mean to do it and if you ask them don’t think they are. But they are and you probably are too. Which is too bad because forearm rotation makes putting more difficult more inconsistent and less effective.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Rye Hill Golf Club

At this point the right wrist is completely on top of the left wrist. Your hands are “through the ball”. You have continued to rotate around your spine, and you have tried to stop the left elbow on the imaginary line. This is the primary action for amateur golfer to increase power, while reducing slice.

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