Richings Park Golf Country Club

Golf Lessons at Richings Park Golf & Country Club

About Richings Park Golf & Country Club

Golf Lessons at Richings Park Golf & Country Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Richings Park Golf & Country Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Richings Park Golf & Country Club

Richings Park Golf Club is built in the Park of a grand Eighteenth Century Country House. The course benefits from the many surviving old trees, which were carefully planted to create a fine setting for the original house. The Withy Brook flows through the grounds and this along with a number of lakes provides added interest. The par 70 course has been laid out to make use of these very attractive features. It is a real challenge for the more accomplished golfer while the less experienced will still find it enjoyable.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 59

When your face angle is pointing left of your Aimline it is closed (again for right-handed golfers). The “open” and “closed” terminology reverses for lefthanders. You must understand and remember that your putterface angle and putter path arc completely independent of each other.

Impact Point

Your impact point refers to the center of the contact area between your ball and putter on the putterface (Figure 4.2.3). For each and every putt there is one unique impact point which sometimes centers on a single dimple but more often several dimples plus an edge of one or more dimples. After many putts your many impact points will form your impact pattern (Figure 4.2.4) which is very important to the success of your putting. Aim path face angle and impact pattern are four of the 15 building blocks fundamental to your putting stroke mechanics. They describe and define how you move your putterhead and how your putterhead moves through the impact zone determines how well you roll your ball relative to your Aimline.

4.3 Defining Speed

Putt Speed

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

3.3 It Gets More Difficult

So we’ve disposed of two methods that no one can or should be allowed to use. What about some techniques that have been tried and in some cases are still in use?

Croquet-Style

Next on the “easiness” scale (which means it’s a little more difficult than the techniques above) is standing so you face the putting line and putt croquet-style between your legs. Yes this really has been used. Bob Duden and Bob Shave Jr. two PGA Tour pros who had been struggling with their putting used this technique back in the 1960s. I’ve never been sure whether the USGA banned this method because it was too easy too nontraditional or it just looked bad when viewed from behind. It certainly made putting easier because it gave the golfer the best view of the line before the putt and a clear view of what the ball was doing immediately after it started to roll.

Both of these views provide critically important feedback that golfers generally miss when putting in the conventional style (that is standing to the side of the line). Croquet-style putting has other benefits: It removes all rotational motion of the forearms (which opens and closes the putterface during conventional putting) it forces the wrists to remain solid (no breakdown) and it creates the perfect in-line stroke path straight down the intended putting line.

Croquet putting is so easy that it was used by no less a legend than Sam Snead in the mid-1960s (when he was in his mid-fifties) to counter a case of the yips. Snead actually putted this way (Figure 3.3.1) – with one foot on either side of the target line – during the 1966 PGA Championship where he finished tied for sixth. Perhaps it was seeing the great Samuel Jackson Snead putt from the wrong direction or perhaps it was deemed to reduce the skill required to play the game – in any case croquet-style putting was quickly outlawed by golf’s powers that be.

So Sam modified the method slightly changing to “sidesaddle” (Figure 3.3.2)

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Richings Park Golf & Country Club

At the end of step two, you reached the top of your backswing. As soon, as you get there, start your downswing. As you start the downswing, make sure to remind yourself to keep your arms “connected” to your chest and shoulders. Stay connected all the way through the ball. Your hands and arms only swing as the shoulders rotate. If you start your downswing by rotating your chest, without starting to swing your arms, you will most definitely end up slicing the ball. If you swing your arms before rotating your chest, you will most likely hook the ball. Staying connected will always produce the straightest ball.

Richings Park Golf & Country Club