Redlibbets Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Redlibbets Golf Club

About Redlibbets Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Redlibbets Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

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The first requirement to enter a competition is to put your entry fee into an envelope, and place in the entry box by the closing date. The entry boxes are located in the Spike Bar or the Pro-Shop. If you have not entered by the closing date you will not be included in the draw for the competition. Please do not ask the organizers to put you in as a late entry as NO late entries will be accepted.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

The drill is performed by putting three-footers from the four different quadrants around a hole as firmly as possible without the balls popping out of the hole. Make a game of it trying to bounce the ball off the back edge of the hole up into the air without producing lip-outs or flying over the cup (Figure 13.3.10) and don’t worry about your misses. Of course I don’t recommend stroking the ball this hard on the course but if you consistently roll your short putts weakly to the cup you need to experience the other side of the mountain during practice so you can settle in the middle on the course.

Drill 5: 17-Inches-Past Drill Rolling putts 17 inches past the hole makes sense to most golfers until they face a short putt. Then they are surprised when I tell them that the 17-inches-past speed is good for putts of all lengths even the very short

Develop Your Artistic Senses (Feel Touch Green-Reading) 323 over the hole. ones. The hole doesn’t know or care where the putt is coming from; it just cares whether or not the ball hits the hole and if so at what speed.

To establish and maintain your feel for the perfect speed on short putts practice this drill from time to time (10 minutes about once a month will do – it doesn’t take long). This drill is to be done by yourself on the green using the Phony-Hole and a dime placed 17 inches behind it. Take three balls and putt them from different distances trying to roll all of them over the cup. Hold your finish (until each putt stops) and watch carefully how close each ball finishes to the dime. If you don ‘t have a good feel for how far 17 inches is half the length of your putter is close enough.

You’ll probably be surprised how easy this drill is. That ‘s good. It is intended to convince your subconscious that if it will just let you roll your short putts the proper speed you won’t have any trouble making them.

Lag-Putt Drill

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Rather we talk about the “Aimline” you intend to start the ball rolling on the “ini tial line” you actually start the ball on and where the “ball track” goes after that.

Ball-Hole Line and Target Line

When we talk about the “ball-hole” line for any putt we mean the straight line between where the ball sits (before you putt it) and the hole (Figure 4.1.2). How ever because the hole is always your ultimate target some golfers call this their

“target line.” But many golfers use “target line” to describe the line between their ball and the point at which they are aiming the line on which they hope to start the putt rolling. But you seldom try both to aim and start your ball rolling along a straight line at the hole and expect it to keep rolling on that line because most putts break at least a little bit.

Therefore it is clearer to refer to this direction as your hall-hole line. Also realize that the ball-hole line extends forever in both directions (as shown) and that it is the ball-hole line that most golfers walk to and stand on behind their ball as they first try to read the break of their putts.

Standing behind the ball trying to read the green most golfers decide how much they think the putt is going to break and then where they are going to aim. They select a point or a direction where they intend to start their putt and we refer to the line from the ball to that point or direction as the “Aimline ” or desired initial starting line of the putt (Figure 4.1.3). It’s best called the Aimline because it is the line along which you align your body feet and (it’s hoped) your stroke because you want to start the ball rolling along that line. It ‘s where you’re aiming. If everything was figured properly the ball starts on your Aimline and will roll the proper speed and break (because of the slope of the green) gently into the cup.

The entire path that your putt takes is the “ball track” (left side of Figure 4.1.4). It may remind you of the “action track” sometimes used on television to show how a ball has traveled. The distances between the balls on the track indicate how fast (relatively) the putt is traveling: Farther apart means it is rolling faster; closer together and it is rolling slower. A detailed ball track provides an accurate understanding of a putt’s entire motion – both where and how fast it was going – better even than the same putt recorded and played back on videotape.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Redlibbets Golf Club

Notice that the left elbow is still locked at this point. The elbow is just crossing the imaginary line that you have created between your eyes and your belly button. Remember, try to stop your elbow at this point. This is the point where your wrists will start to flip through the ball.Also notice the angle between the left arm and the club shaft is almost the same as it was at setup.

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