Purdis Heath Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Purdis Heath Golf Club

About Purdis Heath Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Purdis Heath Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Purdis Heath Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Purdis Heath Golf Club

The 18-hole course at Purdis Heath was designed by James Braid – a name synonymous with high-quality golf architecture.Probably best known for the King’s Course at Gleneagles, Braid also had a large hand in the renovation of such classic courses as Carnoustie, Royal Troon, and Turnberry.Making the best possible use of the natural contours of the heathland surroundings, Braid designed the Purdis course so that its shape resembles a horseshoe which loops around two duck decoy lakes at the centre of estate. The outward holes set off in an anticlockwise flow with the inward holes returning in the opposite direction. The result is that the golfer has to contend with the challenge of coping with winds from varying directions as each hole is played.

Purdis Heath Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

9.10 Golf Balls Have Weird Feet

The game of golf was originally played with a smooth ball. However once the old Scots saw that scuffed balls flew farther the dimple race was on. The aerodynamic effects of dimples are well documented. Modern balls fly farther and straighter than ever before in part as a result of the size and patterning of these dimples. However dimples have a downside: They make it a little more difficult to roll short putts straight.

Imagine if a golf ball had feet how off-line it would roll if it were placed and putted as shown in Figure 9.10.1. If your putter hit a foot first the ball would roll very oddly indeed. Now look at a close-up of a modern golf ball (Figure 9.10.2).

Wind Lopsided Balls Dimples Rain Sleet and Snow 209

To optimize the aerodynamics the dimples consume most of what was originally the spherical surface of the ball. It used to he that balls featured substantial dimple-free areas where you could make contact with your putter on the surface where it was perfectly spherical. It is much less likely that you’ll contact a spherical surface on a modern ball.

Dimples and Direction

Purdis Heath Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

I’ve seen photographs of Locke from which 1 can imagine that his stroke traveled on an in-to-out path with the putterface slightly closed through impact (Fig

Methods of Putting 45 ure 3.5.5). Such a stroke motion would make one think he was trying to hook puns and he may have actually put a very small amount of initial hook spin on his longer putts (his stroke proved both very consistent and very successful – Locke’s putting prowess was legendary). But I’m sure his putts were not spinning to the left or downward when they found the hole. They rolled in just like other golfers’ putts except they may have done so more consistently than any other player of his time. (In section 4.9 you’ll learn that the surface of the green takes all the spin off a putt within the first 20 percent of its roll.)

Bobby Locke was a great putter but his putts did not hook into the hole. preparing to roll a putt.

The Cut Stroke

While there’s no such thing as hooking putts it is possible to cut across the path of one’s putts which is precisely what Chi Chi Rodriguez did while winning more than 30 tournaments in his career. Chi Chi actually putted fairly well in the early years of his career consistently cutting across the ball by swinging the putterhead outside-to-inside across the line (Figure 3.5.6). But his putting failed him later on because a cut stroke makes putting more complex than it needs to be.

It takes a talented athlete like Chi Chi to swing his putter to the left while holding the face open to the right and successfully make his ball go straight. But even he couldn’t do it all the time which is why I think he would have won quite a few more tournaments had he grooved and owned a simpler stroke. (Don’t think the cut stroke spins putts enough to make them slice across the green. The friction of the grass takes all spin off of putts the same as with hook-stroke putts.)

Another unusual – I wouldn’t go so far as to call it unique – putting style was put to good use for many years by Billy Casper. He locked his arms against his stomach and powered his putts purely by hinging his wrists (Figure 3.5.7). Once again Casper no longer uses this method and steers others away from it saying that it took far more time patience and practice to keep sharp than the pendulum stroke that is now popular among Tour pros.

Purdis Heath Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Purdis Heath Golf Club

First of all, it’s important that you realize that your grip will affect the results that you get. However, it’s not as complicated as the other systems make it out to be. First, grab the club with your right hand so the face of it is toward the target. Keep the face pointed toward the target, while placing your left hand on the bottom of the grip or handle. At this point you should be holding your left hand out flat, so that it is touching the bottom of the grip. Position the joint where your left pinky meets your palm directly underneath the handle of the club. Keep the pinky there and place the first joint in your left forefinger directly underneath the club. Now, do not lift your fingers up, bringing the grip of the club into your palm; instead, hold the handle steady with your left fingers and wrap your palm around the top of the grip. This is an important distinction. Again, don’t wrap the fingers towards the palm, but instead wrap your palm around the top of the club. Now, you should be able to easily place your left thumb directly on top of the club. This should form a V-shape where your left thumb and left forefinger meet. This V-shape should point directly to your right shoulder when it’s complete.

Purdis Heath Golf Club