Oadby Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Oadby Golf Club

About Oadby Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Oadby Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Oadby Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Oadby Golf Club

It is a mature parkland course of 6311 yards with large undulating greens proving an interesting challenge to golfers of all abilities. It is rather unique having 9 holes on Leicester racecourse and 9 holes adjacent. On race days the adjacent 9 holes are available for playing.There is a well stocked pro shop manned by Andrew Wells P.G.A. and his team who will do all possible to ensure you enjoy your visit.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

The faster the green speed (i.e. the higher the Stimp reading) then the less energy or initial speed you have to give to your putts to get them to roll the perfect distance. So putts on a fast green actually will be rolling more slowly giving gravity more time to influence the ball and pull it downhill so it will break more. That’s why it’s important to know the green speed when reading the slope and trying to determine how much a putt will break. Of course the opposite is also true that a slower green speed means more friction so you have to roll the ball faster which decreases how much it will break.

Green Speed Can Be Seen

Unfortunately you don’t see many signs at golf courses that read “Warning: Green Speed 12. Putts Will Be Very Fast and Break Excessively. ” But a trained eye can detect and evaluate green speeds within a very small tolerance. If you don ‘t believe me ask any golf course superintendent or PGA Tour pro. Both make their living knowing how fast their greens roll. How do they know? The superintendent regularly takes measurements with a Stimpmeter and the pros talk to the superintendents then correlate what they’re told with their experience of watching their putts roll.

But don’t think you can ask your superintendent the green speed at your course and automatically be an expert. Appearances can be deceiving. Fast greens usually look brownish with short grass and firm surfaces. Most slow greens have long dark green grass and tend to be softer (Figure 8.3.2). Also the thicker the grass even when cut short the slower and greener it looks. So you always should roll a few putts at any new course to check the green speed because a green that looks slow can be “sneaky fast ” and vice versa.

Grain (see section 7.10 for details) also affects a green’s speed. Because Stimpmeter ratings are taken in more than one direction grain is averaged into the green-speed reading. But grain still can have a dramatic effect on how putts roll and break. I’ve measured grain’s effect on numerous occasions: On a 40-foot putt putting against the grain can mean a difference of 10 feet versus the same putt rolled with the grain (Figure 8.3.3). So you must learn to recognize green speed in the direction you are putting.

Speed Is More Important Than Line 187

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

3.3 It Gets More Difficult

So we’ve disposed of two methods that no one can or should be allowed to use. What about some techniques that have been tried and in some cases are still in use?

Croquet-Style

Next on the “easiness” scale (which means it’s a little more difficult than the techniques above) is standing so you face the putting line and putt croquet-style between your legs. Yes this really has been used. Bob Duden and Bob Shave Jr. two PGA Tour pros who had been struggling with their putting used this technique back in the 1960s. I’ve never been sure whether the USGA banned this method because it was too easy too nontraditional or it just looked bad when viewed from behind. It certainly made putting easier because it gave the golfer the best view of the line before the putt and a clear view of what the ball was doing immediately after it started to roll.

Both of these views provide critically important feedback that golfers generally miss when putting in the conventional style (that is standing to the side of the line). Croquet-style putting has other benefits: It removes all rotational motion of the forearms (which opens and closes the putterface during conventional putting) it forces the wrists to remain solid (no breakdown) and it creates the perfect in-line stroke path straight down the intended putting line.

Croquet putting is so easy that it was used by no less a legend than Sam Snead in the mid-1960s (when he was in his mid-fifties) to counter a case of the yips. Snead actually putted this way (Figure 3.3.1) – with one foot on either side of the target line – during the 1966 PGA Championship where he finished tied for sixth. Perhaps it was seeing the great Samuel Jackson Snead putt from the wrong direction or perhaps it was deemed to reduce the skill required to play the game – in any case croquet-style putting was quickly outlawed by golf’s powers that be.

So Sam modified the method slightly changing to “sidesaddle” (Figure 3.3.2)

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Oadby Golf Club

Hold the club steady with your right hand, and place left hand underneath the club as shown. The first joint of the left forefinger should be directly on the bottom of the handle, as well as the last joint of your left pinky. Once you have placed your palm on top of the club, do the same with your left thumb. Place it directly on top of the handle of the club. Next, interlock the left forefinger, and the right pinky. Nudge your right hand all the way towards the bottom of the grip. Now again, wrap the right palm all the way around the top of the grip. Don’t hold the grip of the club in your right palm. You should be able to cover up your left thumb with your right palm if you’ve done it correctly. You’ll see another V-shape being made where your right thumb and right forefinger meet. As a check, this V should be pointing directly at your right shoulder. If it doesn’t point at your right shoulder, rotate your hand on the grip so that it does. Your fingers should be giving the club most of the support it needs, NOT your palms.

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