Nottingham City Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Nottingham City Golf Club

About Nottingham City Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Nottingham City Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Nottingham City Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Nottingham City Golf Club

Bulwell Hall Golf Course is set in mature parkland. This 18-hole, par 69, 6218-yard course will satisfy the most demanding golfer and will test golfers of all abilities in beautiful open countryside. The clubhouse offers a very warm welcome with a full catering service. The professional shop offers a comprehensive range of equipment ideal for society prizes or gifts, at very competitive prices. Teaching golfers of all ages and abilities is our speciality. Tuition is available through the resident professional players.

Nottingham City Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Chiputting

Every golfer should run the “Chiputt Test” to determine the distance at which the chiputt becomes a better choice than putting. The chiputt is a stroke made with a putter but utilizing a chipping grip stance posture swing and follow-through (Figure 13.2.6).

Several years ago I ran a series of tests that showed the longer a putt is the more likely it is to be left short. There are two reasons for this: (1) Bending over in the normal putting posture restricts the power of the putting stroke; and (2) bending over makes it difficult to get a good perspective for distance (Figure 13.2.7). Together these two factors mean amateurs have a hard time giving their putts enough power to roll 80 90 or 100 feet. (This problem is made worse since most golfers seldom practice putts this long.)

So when you have a long putt that you will likely leave short don’t putt it but stand tall and chiputt it. You already know how to chiputt: Just chip the ball using your putter. The only question is at what distance will you chiputt better than you putt? To find out run the Chiputt test:

Walk off distances from 50 to 100 feet and mark them with tees in increments of 10 feet. At 50 feet putt three balls then chiputt three. See which technique rolls

310 Develop Your Artistic Senses (Feel Touch Green-Reading) your balls closer to the hole on average. Move to 60 feet and do the same – three putts and three chiputts. Again evaluate the results for closest average distance to the pin. Repeat from each remaining distance.

Nottingham City Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Don ‘t Fight Your Flow-Lines

The easiest way to putt is with the “flow-lines” of your body aligned parallel-left of your Aimline (any line which is parallel to your Aimline and to the left of it is defined as “parallel-left of the Aimline). You’re probably not familiar with the term “flow-lines ” so look at Figure 4.10.7. The lines of flow through my shoulders forearms hips knees and feet are all parallel and to the left of my Aimline which is shown by the shaded white line on the green.

As I mentioned earlier (section 4.7) your putter will tend to swing naturally down the Aimline through impact if your shoulders are aligned parallel to that direction unless you do something to prevent this move with the muscles of your hands and wrists. So it’s very important to start your setup with the flow-line of your shoulders parallel to your Aimline.

To emphasize the power of this concept my “bad-flow-line” setup is shown in Figure 4.10.8. Look at my shoulder flow-line. From this position do you expect my putter to naturally swing (flow) down the Aimline? No way! It doesn’t do it when Perfy sets up and swings this way and it won’t swing down my Aimline either unless 1 compensate and use my muscles to make it do so.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 99

Once your shoulders are in place your attention should turn to the flow-line through your forearms as they are next most important in determining how your putter will swing through the impact zone. While all of this may sound very simple and in truth it can be for some golfers it does not turn out that way. A sure sign of trouble is the golfer who carries his right (trailing) forearm above and outside the perfect forearm plane as shown in Figure 4.10.9. This is the forearm power position from which it is difficult for the right forearm to not move over and in front of the left forearm through impact. I can assure you that most golfers who putt from this forearm position miss putts to the left when they get excited anxious or scared.

Forearm rotation is probably the most frequent killer of putting strokes I see in my schools. The forearm-power position is easy to get into because it feels natural. Well it is natural but it’s still wrong and it is something you have to resist.

Nottingham City Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Nottingham City Golf Club

Now, you should be standing up straight, with your chest out, and your shoulders back. Your arms should be out in front of you, your elbows locked, and your wrists level with the height of your waist, while holding the club parallel to the ground. Next, bend over AT THE HIPS until the club touches the ground. Move towards or away from the ball according to where the club touches the ground. After some practice, you will be able to judge the distance well enough so that you don’t have to move around to get into position. Keep your chest out and straight while bending over at the hips. It is impossible to overstate the importance of this. You should not be bending with the back at all to reach down to the ball; you should be bending AT THE HIPS. This is one of the most common mistakes made by amateur golfers. If you look at any professional golfer on television, they will ALWAYS have a straight back, and they will ALWAYS bend at the waist to get to the ball. You will feel like your “seat” is protruding backwards more than usual. That is what we want here. Also, it’s okay if the toe of your club is not flush with the ground. It’s should be that way, especially for the long irons.

Nottingham City Golf Club