Norwood Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Norwood Park Golf Club

About Norwood Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Norwood Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Norwood Park Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Recognize Green Speed and Slope

Before you can predict how much a putt will break you must recognize the slope of the green and how fast the ball will roll on it. Back in Chapter 7 1 told you that the more a green slopes the more a putt will break. And the faster the green (the lower its surface friction) the slower you must roll a putt and again the more it will break. So it stands to reason that the better you recognize slopes and green speeds the better you will recognize how much putts will break.

First I’ll deal with green speed (Figure 13.4.3). If you can become proficient at knowing how fast greens are you can imagine how fast the ball is going to roll. Without this there is no way to predict how much it is going to break. There are three ways to learn green speeds: (1) measure them exactly; (2) measure them approximately; and (3) observe other golfers’ results over time.

Develop Your Artistic Senses (Feel Touch Green-Reading) 329 inch backswing strokes discussed in section 12.2) on the practice green before you play each round. Make it a habit to roll three balls on a flat part of the putting green one with each reference stroke. Then roll them in the opposite direction to average out any slope or grain effects. Over time you’ll learn what to expect while each day you’ll get a visual judgment of how the greens are rolling. The accuracy of this method depends on the consistency of your reference strokes; therefore this method will never be as accurate as learning the green-speed scale from the superintendent.

3. As usual the easiest way to do something provides the least satisfying results. You can try to get a feel for green speed by watching other golfers putt noticing how much speed their putts seem to have as they roll versus the way the greens look. This is better than being oblivious to green speed but there’s no point of reference and at best it gives you only an approximation of the speed you’ll be dealing with on any given day.

How About Slopes?

Norwood Park Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 63 the green surface is low letting balls roll farther and longer. A rapidly slowing and short roll off a Stimpmeter means the friction of the green surface is high and the green speed is very slow.

Green speed always affects a putt’s speed and direction of roll (except on dead flat greens where direction is straight no matter what the speed). And the combination of green speed the amount of energy transferred to a putt and the influence of contours and slopes on the greens determines the results of your putts based on how much the putt truly breaks your putt’s initial Aimline and starting speed.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics

Seven of the 15 building blocks of putting deal with stroke mechanics. By the end of this chapter you should understand them and how they affect your ability to putt. These seven fundamentals (Figure 4.4.1) have the most to do with determining the quality of a putting stroke and its results. They are not the only mechanical factors but they are the primary ones and the ones we are most concerned with in our schools. They are your aim power source putter path putterface angle impact point flow lines and putter fitting. If you understand and improve these seven fundamentals you will roll better putts. If you also can understand how to read greens better and learn to have better putting feel and touch then there is no question but that you will also make more putts.

It is a fact proven by testing that the better you aim the better you putt. That’s why I say aim is the first fundamental of putting stroke mechanics. Most golfers aim very poorly which is significant because aim can have a direct impact on all the other fundamentals: If you aim poorly something else in your stroke must compensate to correct for the error.

Aim Is Learned

Aiming is easy. Everybody aims. It is aiming precisely where you want to aim that is more elusive. The fact that most golfers do a poor job of aiming is not surprising because there’s no feedback on a putting green to teach golfers how to aim properly. In the absence of feedback golfers use two inputs to guide their attempts to aim: First they use their previous putting results (what I call reaction aiming) and second they use the look of their putter relative to their Aimline (what I call position aiming). Further explanations are in order.

Norwood Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Norwood Park Golf Club

The right elbow should remain locked to your right side throughout the backswing. As you can see, the left arm is still locked as well.This step is included for many reasons. First, it helps you swing around your spine and promotes a correct shoulder turn. It’s really hard to move your body horizontally, while keeping your right elbow locked to your side at the same time. Secondly, it prevents the “flying elbow.” The flying elbow produces everything from a slice to a wicked hook, depending on what you do with your hands in conjunction with it. So, keeping your elbow in contact with your side will help tremendously in assuring that you swing around your body, every single time. Third, it’s a power-producing move because it will put you in a position to easily flip your hands through the ball. Fourth, keeping your right elbow locked to your side will give you a great point of reference. It keeps your swing plane correct, and is a great indicator of when to stop the back swing. Finally, it helps you to “stay connected” throughout the swing. If you have your right elbow locked at your side, it will be hard to swing your arms without rotating your shoulders and visa versa.

Norwood Park Golf Club