Northenden Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Northenden Golf Club

About Northenden Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Northenden Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Northenden Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Northenden Golf Club

The full 18 holes at Northenden stretches along the banks of the Mersey with some eye-catching views over the 6,432 yard par 72 track…the longest and toughest of the Mersey courses. Two loops of nine holes meander their way through up to one hundred different types of trees and although the course is flat it makes the layout a superb test of golf with a classical card of four par 3’s, four par 5’s and ten par 4’s.

Northenden Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Green-Reading the 15th Building Block 171 provides the best test of grain it is illegal under the Rules of Golf to check this way during play or anytime on the day of play. But you can always do it on the practice green and compare the conditions – notably how the different grains look – out on the course. If you’re playing in a tournament and there’s a practice round by all means conduct the drag test and mark the prevalent grain direction on each part of each green in your yardage book or on a scorecard (a typical Tour pro’s yardage book markings are shown in Figure 7.10.5). It’s legal to gather the information beforehand just not on tournament days.

A last word about grain: Don’t become obsessed with it. Note the direction and learn to make it a small modifying factor in your choosing of the correct true break. It will rarely do more than add or reduce the break (due to slope) you read by 10 percent (unless the putt is dead-straight and you know that there aren’t many of those). A larger effect will he when you have to read putts that arc with or against the grain then modify your touch and feel to lag your putts the proper distance (be aware that distance can be affected by 25 percent or more).

7.11 Plumb Bobs Don’t Work

One practice many golfers use that they think helps them read greens is plumb-bobbing. I’ve studied this procedure and have learned some interesting facts.

Approximately one out of every seven golfers plumb-bobs in some manner while reading break. However most of those who plumb-bob have no grasp of the scientific principles behind a plumb line and cannot explain how they’re using their putters even as they hold them (Figure 7.11.1) in front of their eyes.

The reason they can’t explain how their plumb-bob works is that it doesn’t. The principles of a plumb-bob or plumb line are violated by the way golfers use them to read putts which is an interesting phenomenon.

Northenden Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The track along which your putter travels is your “putter path. ” It can move straight back and straight through in-line with your Aimline it can cut across from outside-to-in or inside-to-out (shown in Figure 4.2.1) or it can loop around your Aimline. Golfers take their putters severely or slightly inside and outside their Aimlines waver along their Aimlines and sometimes incorporate a bit of all of the above into their putting paths. I believe there are almost as many distinct putter paths as there are golfers and I’m sure I haven’t seen them all.

Face Angle

A very important consideration is the putterface angle which we define as the angle between the perpendicular to your putterface and your Aimline (left side

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 59

When your face angle is pointing left of your Aimline it is closed (again for right-handed golfers). The “open” and “closed” terminology reverses for lefthanders. You must understand and remember that your putterface angle and putter path arc completely independent of each other.

Impact Point

Your impact point refers to the center of the contact area between your ball and putter on the putterface (Figure 4.2.3). For each and every putt there is one unique impact point which sometimes centers on a single dimple but more often several dimples plus an edge of one or more dimples. After many putts your many impact points will form your impact pattern (Figure 4.2.4) which is very important to the success of your putting. Aim path face angle and impact pattern are four of the 15 building blocks fundamental to your putting stroke mechanics. They describe and define how you move your putterhead and how your putterhead moves through the impact zone determines how well you roll your ball relative to your Aimline.

Northenden Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Northenden Golf Club

Imagine the line that has been drawn is your spine (axis). When the backswing is made, just rotate everything around that axis. If you do this properly, you will be on the correct plane. This correct swing plane will help your power, accuracy, and consistency. Keep the left arm locked as shown.

Northenden Golf Club