Northcliffe Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Northcliffe Golf Club

About Northcliffe Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Northcliffe Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Northcliffe Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Northcliffe Golf Club

Northcliffe Golf Club is situated in the heart of Yorkshire on the outskirts of Shipley, overlooking the beautiful Aire Valley. It boasts an 18-hole course set in some 100 acres of land, which boasts some of the most scenic holes in Yorkshire; it also has a wide range of snacks and meals available in the Club House.The golf shop, run by the professional Mick Hillas, offers a wide range of top quality clothing and equipment, all at top quality prices. There is a ‘try before you buy’ facility, where new clubs can be custom-fitted along with a fast, efficient repair service.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Golfers’ Grips

However you choose to hold on to the putter your grip should present the putter-face to the ball in a square position through impact keep your forearm flow-lines in good position and allow you to feel the flow of your stroke.

There’s no doubt that the grip is important. But there is no one grip that is best for all golfers. The most common is the “parallel-palm” grip (Figure 11.6.9): Holding the grip along the lifeline of your left hand instead of in the fingers (as in the power grip used on full-swing shots) helps the putter function as part of your arm and decreases the tendency to supply power with your hands (Figure 11.6.10). Keeping the palms parallel to the face of the putter also makes it easy to keep your forearm flow-line in good position (parallel to your Aimline).

Something else which very few people talk about is spreading the hands apart on the grip. The farther apart they are the less active the wrist muscles in the stroke which explains some of the success of the long puller. But spreading the hands also makes it difficult to coordinate the actions of the arms so it is impractical on a standard-length putter (although you might try moving your hands apart a little bit just to see what happens). Unfortunately once you find a good

252 Establish Your Practice Framework grip I don’t know of any feedback devices that help you groove hand positions accurately other than using the flat surfaces of the putter grip itself.

There are many acceptable ways to hold a putter such as the “reverse-overlap ” “finger-down-the-shaft ” “split-grip ” “equal-hand ” “push-hand ” and “baseball” grips (Figure 1L6.11). But without seeing you putt I can only suggest that you test and evaluate a few grips as you work to improve your stroke mechanics. Sometimes changing a grip can affect the path and face angle of your putter through impact; more on that in the next chapter.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

But the best legal way to putt is to take a perfectly fit putter and aim it accurately from a square setup with your feet knees hips shoulder and eye flow-lines aligned parallel-left of your Aimline; put your eyes vertically over the line and your hands vertically under your shoulders; then stroke your putt solidly on the sweetspot with a dead-hands pure-in-line stroke keeping your putterface square to the Aimline (Figure 4.13.1). In the next few chapters you ‘ll learn that if you

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 111 make this stroke in your own body rhythm following a perfect routine and ritual sequence with good touch and feel and play the correct amount of break then you’ve got it.

This pure-in-line-square putting stroke is natural works under pressure minimizes the critical nature of timing and hall position conforms 100 percent to the USGA Rules of Golf and is fundamentally simple to do. I highly recommend it!

CHAPTER 5 Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual

5.1 Controlling the Ball

The whole purpose of putting is to put the ball into the hole in as few strokes as possible. To accomplish this successfully you must consistently strike your puns with precision and accuracy starting them on the correct line and giving them the correct initial speed. If you can accomplish the initial conditions of proper line and speed the rest of your putting results are up to Mother Nature and the greens.

Starting your putts on your chosen initial line is primarily a function of your stroke mechanics specifically aiming your putter properly and striking it with a good path and square face angle. That’s the easy part. Imparting the proper initial speed is significantly more difficult because it involves stroke mechanics (making solid contact on the sweetspot) as well as putting “feel” and “touch” for distance plus your ability to read greens.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Northcliffe Golf Club

The chest and shoulders shouldn’t be turning, unless your arms are turning with them. In other words, you want to start your swing with a shoulder turn, but your arms should start swinging at EXACTLY the same time. They are an extension. They are connected. Furthermore, your arms shouldn’t be swinging unless your chest is rotating. Don’t start swinging your arms without starting the shoulder turn. They are connected. Your left elbow remains locked throughout the entire swing. When you complete your shoulder turn, your arms should stop as well. The goal will be to have your left arm exactly parallel to the ground. Your elbow is still locked. When it gets there…STOP. Do not continue to swing your arms.

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