Newmarket Links Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Newmarket Links Golf Club

About Newmarket Links Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Newmarket Links Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Newmarket Links Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Newmarket Links Golf Club

The attractive and mature 18-hole (par72) course of some 6582 yards was redesigned by that great golf course artichect Colonel Hotchkin, whose golf courses at Woodhall Spa, Ashridge and elsewhere are among the finest in the country. From the point of view of design the Links at Newmarket conforms to his very high standards.

Newmarket Links Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

If you’re going to spend the time and effort to practice then do it right. Many people – including students in my schools – seem to think they don’t have time to practice properly so they rush through it trying to “just get it done. ” But then they find they have to make time to do it over again later because it has to be done right. Save yourself the time and trouble and do it right from the start. You’ll definitely see an improvement in your putting game.

Establish your ground rules for practice and adhere to them. Promise yourself that you’ll always practice with the intent to improve and with the feedback necessary to provide that improvement however small. The key to adhering to such a commitment is to realize that you don’t have to improve much each time you practice to become very good over the long haul. In fact you shouldn’t expect improvement to come quickly or in big leaps. Golf doesn’t work that way. At best you can expect to move a small (usually imperceptible) amount forward every time you practice. As a measure of success be satisfied by seeing improved scores over time.

It’s important to understand that practice makes permanent. So poor practice will only help you become a permanently poor golfer (and if you practice poorly you deserve it). Only perfect practice helps move you toward perfection. My putting practice guidelines are listed in Figure 11.1.1. 1 hope that they will help you set yours.

These guidelines are the foundation (there ‘s that word again!) for all my prac tice sessions. I follow them no matter what aspect of my putting I’m working on

DP’s Practice Guidelines

222 Establish Your Practice Framework believing that by doing so whatever I learned or grooved during the session will stay with me when I get to the course.

Newmarket Links Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

“target line.” But many golfers use “target line” to describe the line between their ball and the point at which they are aiming the line on which they hope to start the putt rolling. But you seldom try both to aim and start your ball rolling along a straight line at the hole and expect it to keep rolling on that line because most putts break at least a little bit.

Therefore it is clearer to refer to this direction as your hall-hole line. Also realize that the ball-hole line extends forever in both directions (as shown) and that it is the ball-hole line that most golfers walk to and stand on behind their ball as they first try to read the break of their putts.

Standing behind the ball trying to read the green most golfers decide how much they think the putt is going to break and then where they are going to aim. They select a point or a direction where they intend to start their putt and we refer to the line from the ball to that point or direction as the “Aimline ” or desired initial starting line of the putt (Figure 4.1.3). It’s best called the Aimline because it is the line along which you align your body feet and (it’s hoped) your stroke because you want to start the ball rolling along that line. It ‘s where you’re aiming. If everything was figured properly the ball starts on your Aimline and will roll the proper speed and break (because of the slope of the green) gently into the cup.

The entire path that your putt takes is the “ball track” (left side of Figure 4.1.4). It may remind you of the “action track” sometimes used on television to show how a ball has traveled. The distances between the balls on the track indicate how fast (relatively) the putt is traveling: Farther apart means it is rolling faster; closer together and it is rolling slower. A detailed ball track provides an accurate understanding of a putt’s entire motion – both where and how fast it was going – better even than the same putt recorded and played back on videotape.

The amount or size of the “break” played on a putt is a measure of the difference between the direction you aim and start the putt rolling and where you want it to go. We define the amount of break as the distance between the Aimline (up by the hole) and the nearest edge of the hole measured along a line between the two (right side of Figure 4.1.4). The actual amount the ball breaks (curves) is something different because the ball track ideally curves into the center of the hole. But golfers refuse to deal with that detail. When golfers say they are playing one inch of break what they mean is that their Aimline passes one inch outside the edge of the hole as shown in Figure 4.1.5. Technically they expect the putt to break 3¼ inches – one inch plus half the diameter of the hole (2½ inches) – but they insist on thinking and saying that they are playing one inch of break.

Golfers the world over have made a tacit agreement to think of break as measured from the edge of the hole rather than the center. Unless the putt breaks less than half the width of the hole. Then we refer to it as breaking from somewhere inside the cup such as an “inside left edge” or “right center ” to the center of the hole. Only then do we acknowledge that our target is the center of the hole.

Let’s be sure that you understand the terms I’ve defined so far. You’ve cleaned your ball on the green and replaced it in front of your mark. Standing behind your ball on the ball-hole line you realize that if you putt directly along that line it will break to the left and miss below the hole. So you move slightly downhill from the

Newmarket Links Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Newmarket Links Golf Club

Now, you should be standing up straight, with your chest out, and your shoulders back. Your arms should be out in front of you, your elbows locked, and your wrists level with the height of your waist, while holding the club parallel to the ground. Next, bend over AT THE HIPS until the club touches the ground. Move towards or away from the ball according to where the club touches the ground. After some practice, you will be able to judge the distance well enough so that you don’t have to move around to get into position. Keep your chest out and straight while bending over at the hips. It is impossible to overstate the importance of this. You should not be bending with the back at all to reach down to the ball; you should be bending AT THE HIPS. This is one of the most common mistakes made by amateur golfers. If you look at any professional golfer on television, they will ALWAYS have a straight back, and they will ALWAYS bend at the waist to get to the ball. You will feel like your “seat” is protruding backwards more than usual. That is what we want here. Also, it’s okay if the toe of your club is not flush with the ground. It’s should be that way, especially for the long irons.

Newmarket Links Golf Club