Newmachar Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Newmachar Golf Club

About Newmachar Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Newmachar Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Newmachar Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Newmachar Golf Club

Newmachar Golf Club, which has hosted European tour and international events, is on the outskirts of Aberdeen, Scotland and near its international airport. Within a two hour drive are other renowned courses such as St Andrews, Gleneagles, Carnoustie, Cruden Bay and Nairn. For tourists and overseas visitors there is nearby Royal Deeside and the historic castles and malt whisky distilleries for which the North-east of Scotland and Speyside are famous. Numerous top class Hotels are within easy driving distance.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Years ago as I began pondering the inconsistencies and uncertainties in putting performance I became fascinated by the possibility of learning enough about putting to help golfers learn to do it better. I had a breakthrough – a moment when I knew I’d truly be able to help people – when I started studying the footprints golfers left on greens. As I watched a ball I’d filmed in slow motion roll innumerable directions on a single putt it seemed as though an army had marched across the green on the line of the putt. I examined that area of the green at sunset. I sat in amazement watching the shadows lengthen wondering how anyone could hole any putt over such an uneven surface. There seemed to be thousands of footprint lines humps humps and heel-print edges in the grass any one of which was capable of turning a slowly rolling ball in a different direction. I realized that even a perfectly stroked putt rolling over that green would have a very good chance of being diverted from the hole. I also realized that an imperfectly stroked putt rolling over that same green would have a chance of being knocked into the hole.

That was one of what I consider the critical “learning moments” I’ve had in golf. Looking closely at that green from ground level I decided to measure the severity of this effect on the entire course. I got up early the next morning and followed the first group while the greens were still covered with dew. This allowed me to actually see and count the individual footprints. I learned that a foursome often makes more than 500 footprints on each green it plays. Even worse these footprints were not evenly distributed: Most were within six feet of the hole because half of all putts were from less than six feet away. They created a trampled-down area between 6 feet and 6 inches away from the hole (no one was so inconsiderate as to step within 6 inches of the cup) and 360 degrees around it. I began referring to this area as the “lumpy donut” (see Figure 2.4.1).

There’s no way a golfer can know how many footprints are between his ball and the hole before a putt. That’s true even if you are in the first group to tee off when the greens are in the best possible condition to allow putts to roll straight and true. Because even then one of the men who cut the grass on the green or cut the cup into the green earlier that morning may have left one footprint dead in the path of your putt as it slows near the hole. And if this one footprint turns your putt away from the hole you’re going to get disgusted and assume it just isn’t your day (or worse think you made a had stroke). If however this footprint turns your ball into the hole you do a little dance (making more footprints!) and assume you hit a great putt. Again this is one more example of the unpredictable and statistical nature of putting. You can’t do much about it but you should be aware of it because you’ll never detect or be absolutely sure about these invisible land mines that lie in wait on the greens.

The Ramp

There was something else I noticed while collecting my lumpy-donut data. On greens where the traffic was particularly intense there was a ramp – a raised area – all around and leading up to the hole. The golfers had trampled near the cup but they were very careful not to step inside the six inches immediately around it so that area was elevated inside the center of the lumpy donut (Figure 2.4.2). These ramps I learned cause many putts that are slowing down and dying as they near the hole to be stopped short or turned away. I measured and found that if those same slow-rolling putts were hit at the same speed on a perfect surface they should have and would have fallen into the hole. So because numerous golfers before you were respectful of the hole your putt missed.

Wind

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Roller you have to find the right speed if you hope to make anything.

Both of these methods are easier than other types of putting because they remove or at least reduce the difficulty of starting the ball on the desired line. But the pool method for sure (and to a certain extent the True Roller) is just as difficult as most other methods in transferring the correct speed to the ball.

This is a point worth repeating because most golfers don’t think enough about the speed of their putts. Rather they focus on line. If you are a “line” putter try putting with a pool cue or a True Roller and I promise you’ll learn to appreciate the importance of speed in making putts.

3.3 It Gets More Difficult

So we’ve disposed of two methods that no one can or should be allowed to use. What about some techniques that have been tried and in some cases are still in use?

Croquet-Style

Next on the “easiness” scale (which means it’s a little more difficult than the techniques above) is standing so you face the putting line and putt croquet-style between your legs. Yes this really has been used. Bob Duden and Bob Shave Jr. two PGA Tour pros who had been struggling with their putting used this technique back in the 1960s. I’ve never been sure whether the USGA banned this method because it was too easy too nontraditional or it just looked bad when viewed from behind. It certainly made putting easier because it gave the golfer the best view of the line before the putt and a clear view of what the ball was doing immediately after it started to roll.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Newmachar Golf Club

After we get through the remaining sections, you will understand that this will change your swing plane a bit. Your swing plane will become more horizontal, the straighter you stand up. Please realize that nothing else should change. You will swing each of your clubs in exactly the same fashion (found below). This repositioning at setup will have a huge effect on the outcome of your shot, so please take some time to see where you are the most comfortable.

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