Newcastle United Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Newcastle United Golf Club

About Newcastle United Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Newcastle United Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Newcastle United Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Newcastle United Golf Club

The Club was formed on 4th June 1892 at a meeting in Lockharts Cocoa Rooms in Clayton Street, Newcastle. The first records in the Golfing Journal of the time show it as being named NEWCASTLE UNITED WORKMEN’S GOLF CLUB which signified that it was for the benefit of all classes, not only the rich and titled, and the spirit of friendship continues to this day.

Newcastle United Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

My Rules of Putting Practice

378 Wrap-Up

You must be careful. Even the balls and putting greens can fool you lying to you too often on your putt results. Your aim setup and stroke mechanics must be learned then refined away from the greens and the hole with feedback. Fortunately everyone regardless of age can learn to putt better and even better ways to learn will be with us in the not-too-distant future.

I’m not interested in selling learning aids but I am interested in your learning so I continue to mention them. My point is and I repeat again if you care enough about improving that you’re going to practice you might as well benefit from that practice. And the key to productive practice is the right kind of feedback the kind you get from practicing with the right kind of feedback devices (Figure 15.4.1).

Don’t use devices that force or control your body to move in a certain way or do it for you. Use feedback devices that allow you to control your movements (you need to learn how to do it right without interference or help from outside agencies) then tell you when you do it right or wrong. The ultimate test of any feedback device: Does it give you the same feeling when you do it right in practice that you’ll get when you do it right on the golf course?

Wrap-Up 379

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Both of these views provide critically important feedback that golfers generally miss when putting in the conventional style (that is standing to the side of the line). Croquet-style putting has other benefits: It removes all rotational motion of the forearms (which opens and closes the putterface during conventional putting) it forces the wrists to remain solid (no breakdown) and it creates the perfect in-line stroke path straight down the intended putting line.

Croquet putting is so easy that it was used by no less a legend than Sam Snead in the mid-1960s (when he was in his mid-fifties) to counter a case of the yips. Snead actually putted this way (Figure 3.3.1) – with one foot on either side of the target line – during the 1966 PGA Championship where he finished tied for sixth. Perhaps it was seeing the great Samuel Jackson Snead putt from the wrong direction or perhaps it was deemed to reduce the skill required to play the game – in any case croquet-style putting was quickly outlawed by golf’s powers that be.

So Sam modified the method slightly changing to “sidesaddle” (Figure 3.3.2)

Methods of Putting 39 doing everything as much as he could the same except bringing both feet to the same side of the target line. Snead continued to putt this way until the end of his competitive career and his creation is I believe the next-easiest way to putt.

Just as with croquet-style Sam found that putting sidesaddle allowed him to bend over slightly and look down the line of his putt. But more important it still did away with the breakdown of his wrists. I’m sure golf’s grand pooh-bahs didn’t like what they saw but either they couldn’t figure out a way to outlaw the sidesaddle technique without getting sued or maybe they didn’t have the heart to drive Sam out of the game. Thank heavens they didn’t because it was wonderful watching him play the game even putting from the side for all those years.

Another Variation on a Theme

Someone else started with Snead’s sidesaddle style and made a modification of his own which produced the best putting I’ve seen to this day. Rather than using a standard-length (roughly 35-inch) putter a fellow came to me putting sidesaddle but with a longer-than-normal (about 42-inch) putter (Figure 3.3.3). He stood beside the putting line facing the hole and swung the putter along a perfect vertical pendulum with his top hand and the top of the putter tucked under his armpit. He leaned over to set his eyes directly over the putting line then balanced his weight by extending one foot away from the line.

Newcastle United Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Newcastle United Golf Club

Hold the club steady with your right hand, and place left hand underneath the club as shown. The first joint of the left forefinger should be directly on the bottom of the handle, as well as the last joint of your left pinky. Once you have placed your palm on top of the club, do the same with your left thumb. Place it directly on top of the handle of the club. Next, interlock the left forefinger, and the right pinky. Nudge your right hand all the way towards the bottom of the grip. Now again, wrap the right palm all the way around the top of the grip. Don’t hold the grip of the club in your right palm. You should be able to cover up your left thumb with your right palm if you’ve done it correctly. You’ll see another V-shape being made where your right thumb and right forefinger meet. As a check, this V should be pointing directly at your right shoulder. If it doesn’t point at your right shoulder, rotate your hand on the grip so that it does. Your fingers should be giving the club most of the support it needs, NOT your palms.

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