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Golf Lessons at New Zealand Golf Club

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Golf Lessons at New Zealand Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit New Zealand Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

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This site is Currently Under Construction Contact Details: Roger A Marrett Secretary Woodham Lane Addlestone Surrey KT15 3QD..

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Forearms Are Number Two

The second most important flow-line is that of your forearms. The usual error is to align it too far to the left (Figure 11.5.7). Many right-handed golfers set their forearms this way because it’s the instinctive position for those using the conventional “right-hand-low (below)” putter grip. With their forearm flow-line pointing left most golfers cut across their putts (it’s the natural flow direction) and

Establish Your Practice Framework 237 compensate by opening their putterfaces through impact. To align your forearm flow-line parallel to your Aimline either tuck your right elbow into your body or use the left-hand-low putting grip (both shown in Figure 11.5.8).

Eyes Are Number Three

When you stand behind your ball and judge the distance of the putt (both when green-reading and making your preliminary stroke as part of your routine) keep your eye flow-line horizontal to the ground. This is called the binocular position because both eyes are working together and feeding a properly triangulated picture of the putt distance to your brain. This is the position from which you can best estimate distance.

However everything changes as you address your putt holding your head over your Aimline trying to align your putter and body to it. In this case both eyes should be on-line – that is vertically over the Aimline – to help orient your flowlines and putterface to it. Many golfers unknowingly set their eye flow-line so it cuts across their Aimline to the left – because they stand open to the Aimline trying to “see-the-target” better – which ironically makes it more difficult to see their proper setup position correctly (shown in Figure 11.5.9).

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 75 lums are illustrated in Figure 4.6.6. Each is swinging from a fixed point with pendulum A swinging vertically below its suspension point describing a back-andforth in-line path along a straight line. Pendulum B is swinging at a 20-degree angle to the vertical supported by a small force shown by arrow B and describing a curved path around the spot directly below its suspension point. Pendulum C is swinging at the opposite 20-degree angle supported by arrow C in a curved motion in the opposite direction around the spot below its suspension point.

All three pendulums are describing pure pendulum motions (the pendulum rhythm will be discussed in section 6.3) which occur in a gravitational field such as that found on Earth. But only pendulum A swings with gravity helping to determine its straight in-line path without any rotation or curvature of the swing path. As you can see both pendulums B and C require outside forces to keep them moving in circular motions.

Now relate these pendulums to putting strokes by attaching putters to the bottom of each pendulum. Pendulum B is what Harvey Penick prescribed: The golfer’s hands hang outside of his shoulder line (the suspension point) at some angle supported by the force B (shown by Justin Leonard in Figure 4.6.7). This puller will describe a curved path around the body like a screen door as long as no hand or arm muscles prevent it from doing so.

In Figure 4.6.8 Fuzzy Zoeller simulates pendulum C by holding his hands inside of his shoulders and at an angle to his suspension point. This putter clearly rotates from outside the Aimline going back to outside the Aimline on the follow-through (the opposite of the screen-door rotation of pendulum B). Again this is a natural pendulum motion but it requires a small force (C) to keep his hands and his I5-degree angle to the vertical below the suspension point.

In these two examples of pendulums B and C it is clear that small side forces are required to make these strokes acceptable for putting and both strokes involve curved paths rotating around the golfer’s body. Now look at pendulum A as a putting stroke which involves no side force or curving path.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 77

The Simplest Pendulum

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition New Zealand Golf Club

Now that you have the proper grip with your left hand, we can focus on the right hand. Wrap your right fingers lightly around the handle of the club as shown to the left.

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