New Forest Golf Club

Golf Lessons at New Forest Golf Club

About New Forest Golf Club

Golf Lessons at New Forest Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit New Forest Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

New Forest Golf Club

The New Forest Golf Club is a very picturesque heathland course situated at Lyndhurst in the heart of the forest, but only 6 miles from Southampton.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Speaking of the subconscious realize that it is a very powerful force that can be used to help you improve or if you don’t use it correctly will keep you from improving. The subconscious will take over if given half a chance so you want the “habits” that it reverts to (under pressure when you’re nervous when you’re scared) to be good ones. And the way to get good habits into your subconscious is to understand what they are and then practice them – properly.

Indoor Learning

Putting stroke mechanics are best learned indoors (away from the practice putting green) with immediate accurate and reliable feedback from appropriate learning-aid devices (for details see Chapters 11 12 and 13). Elimination of the hole and where the ball is going to roll is a major benefit to such practice. By eliminating the distraction of making or missing putts you can focus on what you are trying to learn get feedback on how you’re doing and learn faster and more efficiently (Figure I5.3.1).

This is very different from practice for the full swing where hitting balls at a driving range can provide benefits intuitively (when you make a good driver swing you see a good drive; when you make a good 8-iron swing you see a good 8-iron shot; when you make bad swings you see bad shots). A driving range is a relatively good learning environment for the full swing. However practicing putting is nothing like that. Most golfers miss putts when they’re “practicing” on a putting green and have no idea why. The reason is they ‘re not getting reliable helpful feedback and more practice doesn’t help the situation.

Outdoor Learning

Touch feel and green-reading must be learned outdoors on putting greens (real or artificial). Again good feedback is beneficial and you must get into the habit of

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The true measure of the Tour pros’ putting is indicated by the percentage of putts they make (“convert”) based solely on the length of the putts (shown in Figure 1.4.1 page 7). The shaded curve is data on PGA Tour players taken between the years 1977 and 1992 and shows the spread between the best and worst conversion percentages. It has now been almost 10 years since we measured how well the pros putt and the Pelz Golf Institute is in the process of repeating this test. We hope we’ll find that the percentages have changed in recent years (they remained fairly consistent in the period from ’87 to ’92) as the conditions of greens improve and as players improve their skills (and perhaps as some of our teaching is taking effect).

If you want an answer to question 2 – “How well do you putt?” – you must measure your percentage of putts holed from each distance. You can do this but it will take some effort. You have to record the distance of each putt on your scorecard as you move around the course and indicate those you hole. After 10 to 15

Problems on the Greens 29 rounds (and at least 5 to 10 putts from each distance) you’ll begin to be able to plot your own conversion chart and compare it to those of the pros.

As for question 3 – “How good can one get at putting?” – the answer depends on a number of things: the quality of the greens how well a player reads those greens and the quality of the player’s stroke and touch. Although none of these questions can be answered definitively in this book I assure you that all of the above are getting better all the time. As greens improve putting strokes improve and golfers learn to read greens better a higher percentage of putts from every distance will be made in the future.

Finally “Flow good will your putting be in the future?” That depends on your ability to learn the mechanics of a better putting stroke your ability to learn better putting feel and touch your ability to learn to read greens better and your ability to produce the right stroke at the right time. Depending on your lifestyle your determination and intensity your focus your self-discipline and practice habits and your ability to learn only you can provide this answer.

For most golfers to improve their scores it is often easier to reduce their number of three-putts than it is to increase their number of one-putts. This is generally true for golfers with handicaps greater than 20 although it is even true for some very fine lower-handicap players. As you can see in Figure 2.9.1 the length of the most frequent first putt on greens hit from outside 60 yards is 38 feet. (This distance varies a little with the handicap of the players measured but obviously there are many more long first putts than short ones.) This figure also shows that the most frequent first putt to follow shots hit from inside 60 yards is an 18-footer. If you combine these two curves and add in all the second and third putts that become necessary after the first putt is missed you can see a typical value for the number of putts of each length golfers face per round over a season of golf (Figure 2.9.2).

Now look at the conversion curve for this group of 15- to 25-handicap golfers (Figure 2.9.3) and the frequency with which they three-putt versus the putt distance (Figure 2.9.4). By comparing these data you can see the importance of making short putts as well as learning that you can save several strokes per round by eliminating three-putts from outside 30 feet. This means that you shouldn’t practice only short putts; the long ones are also important. And you must stop three-putting those long ones if you want to be a good putter.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition New Forest Golf Club

At this point the right wrist is completely on top of the left wrist. Your hands are “through the ball”. You have continued to rotate around your spine, and you have tried to stop the left elbow on the imaginary line. This is the primary action for amateur golfer to increase power, while reducing slice.

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