Muthill Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Muthill Golf Club

About Muthill Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Muthill Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Muthill Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Muthill Golf Club

Established in 1912 and reopened in 1935 by Jessie Anderson, later Jessie Valentine the three times British Ladies Amateur Champion. (Sadly Jessie passed away in April 2006.) An undulating parkland course, with narrow fairways, small well bunkered greens and picturesque views of Strathearn and the Grampians. It is a challenge for golfers of all handicaps. Situated in Perthshire, six miles from the Gleneagles Hotel golf complex, venue for the 2014 Ryder Cup.This nine hole golf course with a friendly welcome caters for visitors and parties and the clubhouse has catering during the season.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Aim- line would stand out as the one on which you holed the greatest number of putts.

That would be the optimum Aimline for that putt and the best speed for that op timum Aimline would he the optimum speed.

Because speed and line are intertwined you can look at this situation in the opposite way. There are many speeds at which any given putt can be made and for each of those speeds there is a most desirable or optimum Aimline. By rolling thousands of putts one speed would prove to have the greatest rate of success and that would be the optimum speed for that putt. The Aimline associated with it would be the optimum Aimline. Just as important as knowing that there are many makable Aimline/speed combinations realize that there are many more combinations that have no chance of finding the hole. For example any line/speed combination that leaves a putt short is no good. And any combination that had enough speed to roll the ball more than approximately eight feet past the hole is similarly out of the question. (The exact distance varies due to the green speed the condition of the back edge of the hole and the slope.) Suffice it to say eight feet past is roughly the maximum speed at which any Aimline can work.

8.5 The Lumpy Donut

If lots of speed/Aimline combinations roll the ball into the hole why is one better than all the rest? Why does one produce a higher percentage of putts made? Blame the greens.

The surfaces of most putting greens are not perfect. Unless you’re in the very first group of the day (and even that doesn’t guarantee perfection) the greens will be covered with footprints pitch marks from incoming shots and spike marks that can and will knock rolling balls off-line. Furthermore the edges of the hole often are worn down beat up or improperly cut. All of these imperfections get worse as the day goes on (more footprints more spike marks more pitch marks). That’s why whenever I watch a Tour event and see a player in one of the last groups make an important putt I applaud the player for both his (or her) good putting and good luck in negotiating the minefield of bad conditions between the ball and the hole.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

And that is what you see if you look at many putting greens today. Golfers practicing practicing and practicing – who knows what they are practicing? – all hoping their putting will improve. Some of them practice a different thing every day and use a different stroke in every round. Some golfers even use several differ ent strokes during one round. Yes sir-ee they remind me of a bunch of pigeons!

Something else you need to think about before actually beginning to work on your stroke are the answers to a few questions. They are important questions but only if you want to know just how good your putting can get: (1) How good are the world’s best putters? (2) How well do you putt now? (3) How good can one get at putting? (4) How good will your putting be in the future?

Let me answer these as best I can:

I believe the best putters in the world are playing on the PGA Tour. My proof is the results of the first two World Putting Championships where the Tour pros were seriously challenged by some Senior Tour players several LPGA Tour players and a number of amateurs both young and old. However the PGA Tour players placed higher as a group than any other.

Also my data on the percentage of putts holed from different distances shows that the PGA Tour players lead all other groups. Don’t think that you can look at the statistics quoted in the newspapers and find this information because the number that the papers publish (provided by the Tour) simply show how many putts the players average on greens hit in regulation which is affected by the quality of their iron shots (the better the iron play the shorter their putts). And these are the new putting stats. Years ago the Tour’s statistics measured putts taken per green which was influenced by how many greens players missed and how consistently they chipped close to the hole (again leaving them shorter putts). Neither of these statistics measures the quality of a player’s putting because both are strongly influenced by the quality of different shots (approaches and chips).

The true measure of the Tour pros’ putting is indicated by the percentage of putts they make (“convert”) based solely on the length of the putts (shown in Figure 1.4.1 page 7). The shaded curve is data on PGA Tour players taken between the years 1977 and 1992 and shows the spread between the best and worst conversion percentages. It has now been almost 10 years since we measured how well the pros putt and the Pelz Golf Institute is in the process of repeating this test. We hope we’ll find that the percentages have changed in recent years (they remained fairly consistent in the period from ’87 to ’92) as the conditions of greens improve and as players improve their skills (and perhaps as some of our teaching is taking effect).

If you want an answer to question 2 – “How well do you putt?” – you must measure your percentage of putts holed from each distance. You can do this but it will take some effort. You have to record the distance of each putt on your scorecard as you move around the course and indicate those you hole. After 10 to 15

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Muthill Golf Club

First of all, it’s important that you realize that your grip will affect the results that you get. However, it’s not as complicated as the other systems make it out to be. First, grab the club with your right hand so the face of it is toward the target. Keep the face pointed toward the target, while placing your left hand on the bottom of the grip or handle. At this point you should be holding your left hand out flat, so that it is touching the bottom of the grip. Position the joint where your left pinky meets your palm directly underneath the handle of the club. Keep the pinky there and place the first joint in your left forefinger directly underneath the club. Now, do not lift your fingers up, bringing the grip of the club into your palm; instead, hold the handle steady with your left fingers and wrap your palm around the top of the grip. This is an important distinction. Again, don’t wrap the fingers towards the palm, but instead wrap your palm around the top of the club. Now, you should be able to easily place your left thumb directly on top of the club. This should form a V-shape where your left thumb and left forefinger meet. This V-shape should point directly to your right shoulder when it’s complete.

Muthill Golf Club