Musselburgh Old Course Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Musselburgh Old Course Golf Club

About Musselburgh Old Course Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Musselburgh Old Course Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Musselburgh Old Course Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Musselburgh Old Course Golf Club

The Old Links at Musselburgh was originally seven holes, with another added in 1838 and the full nine-holes came into play in 1870. The first three holes stretched eastwards from the grandstand at the racecourse, site of the former clubhouse of the Honourable Company. To the right is the main traffic route onto which the Musselburgh golfers sliced their shots and played back to the links using the new brass-soled clubs. The metal plate on the ‘brassie’ wooden club was invented here in 1885, to deal with such shots. At the fourth green there still stands Mrs Foreman’s Inn there used to be a hatch in the wall through which refreshments could be passed to the early golfers. The course turns northwest with the next three holes following the coastline and the eighth returning south towards the Home Hole, which is now the present first hole.

Musselburgh Old Course Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

My bet is that you will say at the end of this round “This is making putting too difficult. It’s really hard to make breaking putts this way.”

Larger Compensations Are More Difficult in the past you’ve been depending on your subconscious to compensate for the two-thirds of the break above your normal under-read (about 30 percent of the true break). This test adds the original break you read (the visible break you believe is the true break) to the 70 percent of the break you don’t believe is there anyway to see if your subconscious can handle that too. I think you’ll find as i have that the farther you set up and aim away from the true-break Aimline the worse you’ll putt. The bigger the compensation the more difficult it is to make it accurately. The simpler the better … again.

7.9 Facts About Break

You need one more bit of insight into how balls roll on greens before you start to reconstruct your green-reading abilities. The true amount any putt will break depends on the slope of the green the green speed (determined by the type length and grain of the grass; the moisture content of the soil; and the humidity) the length of the putt and how fast it is rolled among other things. Among those “other things” are the lumpy donut (explained in Chapter 8) the wind and the balance of your golf ball (both Chapter 9). At this point however I want to show you some of the basic fundamentals of how generic balls behave on the surfaces of generic greens. The slope on the green surface is the primary determinant of how much if at all a putt will break. As you can see in Figure 7.9.1 if the surface is flat and level there is no side force due to gravity so a putt will roll straight. But as soon as a slope provides a downhill component from the force of gravity (Figure 7.9.2) a putt will start to break downhill. At any given speed the greater the slope of the green the more the putt will break down the hill.

Speed Affects Break

The faster a ball rolls the less it will break on its way to the hole; the slower it rolls the more it will break. That’s an oversimplification but the concept is true. Here’s why:

Musselburgh Old Course Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

I’ve seen photographs of Locke from which 1 can imagine that his stroke traveled on an in-to-out path with the putterface slightly closed through impact (Fig

Methods of Putting 45 ure 3.5.5). Such a stroke motion would make one think he was trying to hook puns and he may have actually put a very small amount of initial hook spin on his longer putts (his stroke proved both very consistent and very successful – Locke’s putting prowess was legendary). But I’m sure his putts were not spinning to the left or downward when they found the hole. They rolled in just like other golfers’ putts except they may have done so more consistently than any other player of his time. (In section 4.9 you’ll learn that the surface of the green takes all the spin off a putt within the first 20 percent of its roll.)

Bobby Locke was a great putter but his putts did not hook into the hole. preparing to roll a putt.

The Cut Stroke

While there’s no such thing as hooking putts it is possible to cut across the path of one’s putts which is precisely what Chi Chi Rodriguez did while winning more than 30 tournaments in his career. Chi Chi actually putted fairly well in the early years of his career consistently cutting across the ball by swinging the putterhead outside-to-inside across the line (Figure 3.5.6). But his putting failed him later on because a cut stroke makes putting more complex than it needs to be.

It takes a talented athlete like Chi Chi to swing his putter to the left while holding the face open to the right and successfully make his ball go straight. But even he couldn’t do it all the time which is why I think he would have won quite a few more tournaments had he grooved and owned a simpler stroke. (Don’t think the cut stroke spins putts enough to make them slice across the green. The friction of the grass takes all spin off of putts the same as with hook-stroke putts.)

Another unusual – I wouldn’t go so far as to call it unique – putting style was put to good use for many years by Billy Casper. He locked his arms against his stomach and powered his putts purely by hinging his wrists (Figure 3.5.7). Once again Casper no longer uses this method and steers others away from it saying that it took far more time patience and practice to keep sharp than the pendulum stroke that is now popular among Tour pros.

Musselburgh Old Course Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Musselburgh Old Course Golf Club

Notice that the left elbow is still locked at this point. The elbow is just crossing the imaginary line that you have created between your eyes and your belly button. Remember, try to stop your elbow at this point. This is the point where your wrists will start to flip through the ball.Also notice the angle between the left arm and the club shaft is almost the same as it was at setup.

Musselburgh Old Course Golf Club