Murrayfield Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Murrayfield Golf Club

About Murrayfield Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Murrayfield Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Murrayfield Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Murrayfield Golf Club

Murrayfield Golf Club’s creation in 1896 was part of the late nineteenth century explosion of interest in golf in Edinburgh which saw many private clubs created. The Murrayfield area was not as heavily populated as it is today and the bulk of the early membership came from the Haymarket district, the New Town and Western suburbs. Many of the founder members of the Club were already heavily involved in golf in East Lothian. No doubt they helped to create a course conveniently situated near their homes and businesses so that their love of this increasingly popular game could be pursued more easily. And while they played over the new fairways which stretched up the lower slopes of Corstorphine Hill, they could catch a glimpse of East Lothian and their other courses!

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

5.8 The Preview Stroke

Once you see and feel the perfect practice stroke you must believe that if you re peat it exactly you will make the putt. If you don’t believe this make a few more practice swings. Only after you have seen what you believe to be your perfect practice stroke – what I call the “preview stroke” – can your mind’s eye know exactly what you want for your real stroke. This combination of vision feel and belief will give you the confidence to repeat that preview stroke as your real stroke. And that is how you hole putts.

Jack Nicklaus (Figure 5.8.1) once beat Tom Weiskopf in the final round to win a tournament. Although Tom had hit the ball better from tee to green all day Jack had holed an unusually large number of putts including one on the final hole to settle the matter. After it was all over Torn commented to Jack “You knew you were going to make that putt before you putted it didn’t you?”

Jack replied “No I didn’t. But I believed I would. That’s no different than for all the other putts I hit today and every other day though. I don’t putt until I think I’m ready to make it. Do you? And if you don’t then why the hell do you putt it?”

That s classic Jack and dead on target. If you don’ t have a clear idea of the feel and touch of the stroke needed to make the putt then you aren’t ready to putt. It sounds simple and obvious but of the thousands of golfers I ‘ve taught putting to very few stand over the ball fully believing in their ability to hole the putt. Most golfers are thinking about their stroke mechanics thinking negative thoughts about missing or three-putting or doubting their aim. Is it any wonder they miss? Not to me.

5.9 Preparation: The Routine

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Ball-Hole Line and Target Line

When we talk about the “ball-hole” line for any putt we mean the straight line between where the ball sits (before you putt it) and the hole (Figure 4.1.2). How ever because the hole is always your ultimate target some golfers call this their

“target line.” But many golfers use “target line” to describe the line between their ball and the point at which they are aiming the line on which they hope to start the putt rolling. But you seldom try both to aim and start your ball rolling along a straight line at the hole and expect it to keep rolling on that line because most putts break at least a little bit.

Therefore it is clearer to refer to this direction as your hall-hole line. Also realize that the ball-hole line extends forever in both directions (as shown) and that it is the ball-hole line that most golfers walk to and stand on behind their ball as they first try to read the break of their putts.

Standing behind the ball trying to read the green most golfers decide how much they think the putt is going to break and then where they are going to aim. They select a point or a direction where they intend to start their putt and we refer to the line from the ball to that point or direction as the “Aimline ” or desired initial starting line of the putt (Figure 4.1.3). It’s best called the Aimline because it is the line along which you align your body feet and (it’s hoped) your stroke because you want to start the ball rolling along that line. It ‘s where you’re aiming. If everything was figured properly the ball starts on your Aimline and will roll the proper speed and break (because of the slope of the green) gently into the cup.

The entire path that your putt takes is the “ball track” (left side of Figure 4.1.4). It may remind you of the “action track” sometimes used on television to show how a ball has traveled. The distances between the balls on the track indicate how fast (relatively) the putt is traveling: Farther apart means it is rolling faster; closer together and it is rolling slower. A detailed ball track provides an accurate understanding of a putt’s entire motion – both where and how fast it was going – better even than the same putt recorded and played back on videotape.

The amount or size of the “break” played on a putt is a measure of the difference between the direction you aim and start the putt rolling and where you want it to go. We define the amount of break as the distance between the Aimline (up by the hole) and the nearest edge of the hole measured along a line between the two (right side of Figure 4.1.4). The actual amount the ball breaks (curves) is something different because the ball track ideally curves into the center of the hole. But golfers refuse to deal with that detail. When golfers say they are playing one inch of break what they mean is that their Aimline passes one inch outside the edge of the hole as shown in Figure 4.1.5. Technically they expect the putt to break 3¼ inches – one inch plus half the diameter of the hole (2½ inches) – but they insist on thinking and saying that they are playing one inch of break.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Murrayfield Golf Club

Keep focusing on bringing your right shoulder back and around your spine. Some of you may be able to turn about 90 degrees around your spine as shown in the picture on the left. Others may only be able to turn 45 degrees around your spine. Either is okay, but do not start moving other parts of the body to compensate for not being able to make a full shoulder turn. Stop when it gets uncomfortable. The important part is to STAY CONNECTED. When your left arm becomes parallel to the ground, stop your swing.

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