Mortehoe Woolacombe Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Mortehoe & Woolacombe Golf Club

About Mortehoe & Woolacombe Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Mortehoe & Woolacombe Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Mortehoe & Woolacombe Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Mortehoe & Woolacombe Golf Club

Established in 1992, the Woolacombe & Mortehoe Golf Club in Devon has an exceptional headland 9 hole golf course with panoramic sea views, an excellent standard of presentation and an ideal location on the Golden Coast of the idyllic North Devon countryside.

Mortehoe & Woolacombe Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

The Subconscious Fights

I believe this battle between the conscious and subconscious minds is the reason golfers feel uncomfortable standing over many of their putts. Consciously they’re thinking about playing three inches of break outside the left edge while subconsciously they are aiming their putter and body for a putt that breaks at least 6 inches.

Now playing 70 percent of the break is much better than playing 30 percent but it still isn’t enough. Yes the subconscious compensation corrects for a major portion of most players’ inability to read greens but even correcting to 70 percent means most golfers still should miss their putts on the low side of the hole.

But again this is not the end of the story.

7.4 The In-Stroke Correction Now take a look at what happened when these golfers actually made their strokes. Remember they professed to playing less than a third of the true-break then stood over their putts and aimed for 65 to 75 percent of the true-break value. Then believe it or not as they swung their putters they subconsciously made in-stroke compensations to pull or push their putts onto a starting line at between 85 and 95 percent of the true break (Figure 7.4.1). It was amazing but it happened almost every time and still happens whenever I run the test. When I first started researching this behavior I thought “How could golfers not know they are doing this?” I’ve since learned a very important lesson: In golf the subconscious always wins. Golfers do many things they are not aware of. They don’t swing the way they think they swing (for proof watch some one’s face the first time he sees his swing on video) and they don’t play anywhere near the same break they think they’re playing when they putt.

It Is Amazing

Mortehoe & Woolacombe Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 59

When your face angle is pointing left of your Aimline it is closed (again for right-handed golfers). The “open” and “closed” terminology reverses for lefthanders. You must understand and remember that your putterface angle and putter path arc completely independent of each other.

Impact Point

Your impact point refers to the center of the contact area between your ball and putter on the putterface (Figure 4.2.3). For each and every putt there is one unique impact point which sometimes centers on a single dimple but more often several dimples plus an edge of one or more dimples. After many putts your many impact points will form your impact pattern (Figure 4.2.4) which is very important to the success of your putting. Aim path face angle and impact pattern are four of the 15 building blocks fundamental to your putting stroke mechanics. They describe and define how you move your putterhead and how your putterhead moves through the impact zone determines how well you roll your ball relative to your Aimline.

4.3 Defining Speed

Putt Speed

The velocity with which a ball moves along the green can be referred to in several ways. Some golfers refer to this as the rolling speed or speed of the putt. Some golfers talk about the pace of a putt while others talk about how fast a putt is moving. It would be nice if we all could mean and understand the same thing when referring to speed.

Mortehoe & Woolacombe Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Mortehoe & Woolacombe Golf Club

Focus on using your spine as your axis now. Turn both shoulders and sides directly around your spine. Keep your left arm locked, and your left wrist locked. Although difficult to see from this camera-angle, the triangle is still perfectly in tact.

Mortehoe & Woolacombe Golf Club