Morpeth Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Morpeth Golf Club

About Morpeth Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Morpeth Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Morpeth Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Morpeth Golf Club

Morpeth Golf Club has a long history, and our golf course is one of the finest in Northumberland. With easy access from the A1, Morpeth Golf Club offers a wonderful golfing experience to test even the finest golfer. We are a forward-looking club, and with ongoing development of our facilities we always aim to offer a unique place to socialise, relax and get the most out of your game.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

I believe the best putters in the world are playing on the PGA Tour. My proof is the results of the first two World Putting Championships where the Tour pros were seriously challenged by some Senior Tour players several LPGA Tour players and a number of amateurs both young and old. However the PGA Tour players placed higher as a group than any other.

Also my data on the percentage of putts holed from different distances shows that the PGA Tour players lead all other groups. Don’t think that you can look at the statistics quoted in the newspapers and find this information because the number that the papers publish (provided by the Tour) simply show how many putts the players average on greens hit in regulation which is affected by the quality of their iron shots (the better the iron play the shorter their putts). And these are the new putting stats. Years ago the Tour’s statistics measured putts taken per green which was influenced by how many greens players missed and how consistently they chipped close to the hole (again leaving them shorter putts). Neither of these statistics measures the quality of a player’s putting because both are strongly influenced by the quality of different shots (approaches and chips).

The true measure of the Tour pros’ putting is indicated by the percentage of putts they make (“convert”) based solely on the length of the putts (shown in Figure 1.4.1 page 7). The shaded curve is data on PGA Tour players taken between the years 1977 and 1992 and shows the spread between the best and worst conversion percentages. It has now been almost 10 years since we measured how well the pros putt and the Pelz Golf Institute is in the process of repeating this test. We hope we’ll find that the percentages have changed in recent years (they remained fairly consistent in the period from ’87 to ’92) as the conditions of greens improve and as players improve their skills (and perhaps as some of our teaching is taking effect).

If you want an answer to question 2 – “How well do you putt?” – you must measure your percentage of putts holed from each distance. You can do this but it will take some effort. You have to record the distance of each putt on your scorecard as you move around the course and indicate those you hole. After 10 to 15

Problems on the Greens 29 rounds (and at least 5 to 10 putts from each distance) you’ll begin to be able to plot your own conversion chart and compare it to those of the pros.

As for question 3 – “How good can one get at putting?” – the answer depends on a number of things: the quality of the greens how well a player reads those greens and the quality of the player’s stroke and touch. Although none of these questions can be answered definitively in this book I assure you that all of the above are getting better all the time. As greens improve putting strokes improve and golfers learn to read greens better a higher percentage of putts from every distance will be made in the future.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Detailed procedures for learning how to aim properly will be discussed in sec tion 12.6 where I’ll show you how to improve and even perfect your ability to aim. But for now realize that aim is an essential fundamental of putting a learned skill you have probably learned incorrectly (without knowing it) based on the results of past putting strokes and the positioning of your eyes (which you should keep vertically above the Aimline Figure 4.4.4).

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 67

If you don ‘t learn to aim correctly then no one (myself and my Scoring Game Schools included) will ever be able to teach you a good putting stroke. A good putting stroke with bad aim will miss every time and your subconscious will never let you learn a stroke that it knows will miss every time. Instead you ‘ll begin compensating. However once you learn to aim accurately along the Aimline you choose your putting instincts will lead you to make better less compensating strokes and that leads to holing more putts.

4.5 Power Source

Your power source is the part of your body that supplies the power to control and move the putter through the impact zone of your stroke. The muscles you use to control your putter determine your putting power source. The three most common power sources used in putting are: (1) the small muscles of the fingers hands wrists and forearms; (2) the arms and shoulders; and (3) body motion.

Fingers Hands and Wrists

Most golfers control their putting with the small muscles of their hands wrists and forearms. These are the muscles that control most of the things we do in life – hitting things twisting things moving things – so using our hands and forearms in golf is instinctive and therefore feels natural to us. But instinct and natu

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Morpeth Golf Club

At the end of step two, you reached the top of your backswing. As soon, as you get there, start your downswing. As you start the downswing, make sure to remind yourself to keep your arms “connected” to your chest and shoulders. Stay connected all the way through the ball. Your hands and arms only swing as the shoulders rotate. If you start your downswing by rotating your chest, without starting to swing your arms, you will most definitely end up slicing the ball. If you swing your arms before rotating your chest, you will most likely hook the ball. Staying connected will always produce the straightest ball.

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