Minehead West Somerset Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Minehead & West Somerset Golf Club

About Minehead & West Somerset Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Minehead & West Somerset Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Minehead & West Somerset Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Minehead & West Somerset Golf Club

Founded in 1882, Minehead and West Somerset is the second oldest club in Somerset. Whilst preserving the best traditions of the sport, we have a progressive outlook and take pride in both maintaining and developing our magnificent course. There is always a warm and friendly welcome to individual golfers, societies, corporate groups and visitors.18 holes, 6153 yards. S.S.S. 70.

Minehead & West Somerset Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

There’s nothing worse than working hard on the wrong thing expecting improvement from it then ending up with nothing.

In our three-day schools we have the time and equipment necessary to perform all these measurements accurately on facilities specially designed to teach the short game and putting. I point this out not because I’m trying to sell schools but because I want you to know what is available and what is the best way to learn to putt better.

There are some things we can’t measure in schools and clinics statistics only the golfer can keep track of. For example it’s particularly informative to analyze one’s missed-putt pattern to see if there is a favorite way of missing. We invariably find that there is a miss preference although golfers sometimes deny this until someone accumulates the data and shows it to them.

We quantify misses by breaking them into nine categories or zones (Figure 10.2.1) and keeping a record of them over time. Once you know if there is a pattern and if so which one it becomes easier to deal with whatever is causing it. Several of the games described in the next few chapters were developed to retrain golfers’ subconscious habits resulting in the elimination of such patterns.

For example if you learned that you tend to miss short and to the right of the hole (zone 2) the assumption might be that you strike putts on the toe of the putter. After confirming this by measurement (using `Teacher Putting Impact ‘tape) you would practice with Teacher Clips (to improve your impact pattern) and play the game called “Safety Drawback” (to improve your feel and touch). In time your

216 The Improvement Process pattern of misses short and right would disappear and you would start making more putts (more details of this problem are in section 12.3).

Minehead & West Somerset Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

A pendulum stroke works under pressure because adrenaline-filled muscles don’t get to determine how far the ball rolls. In this stroke putting speed and roll are determined solely by the length of the stroke motion. As a result if you practice controlling speed this way you can be sure that it will work on the course and under pressure the same way. And that’s what you want.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 71

4.6 Putter Path Is a Small Factor

I’m fairly sure there are almost as many different putting paths as there are golfers. And it seems there are as many ways to stand over (address) a putt too. Even for the same golfer each day’s stroke path seems to he different from the last with some golfers changing their paths from straight to breaking putts and changing again from a right-to-left breaker to a left-to-right breaker. Common sense should tell you that changing this often can’t be a good idea; my putting mantra – “simpler is better” – guarantees that the more different putting strokes you employ the worse your problems on the green.

The most practiced putting fundamental is the putter path. However my testing shows that path is actually one of the least significant factors in good putting. Yet when I ask golfers on the practice green what they are working on the most common answer is always “the path of my putter.”

The direction that the putter is moving at the moment of impact has very little influence on the starting direction of a putt: Assuming you make contact on the putter’s sweetspot the degree of influence is only about 17 percent (Figure 4.6.1). That means if the putterface is square to the intended starting line and the putter moves across that line at a 10-degree angle as it makes contact the ball will start only 1.7 degrees off-line (17 percent times 10 degrees equals 1.7 degrees).

So you can make a large error in your stroke path and see only a small error in the starting line of your putt. Another way to think of it is this: On a dead-straight five-foot putt your path could travel along a line aimed 13 inches left of the hole center and the ball would still hit the left edge (Figure 4.6.2) assuming you hit the sweetspot and everything else about your stroke was perfect.

Minehead & West Somerset Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Minehead & West Somerset Golf Club

Hold the club steady with your right hand, and place left hand underneath the club as shown. The first joint of the left forefinger should be directly on the bottom of the handle, as well as the last joint of your left pinky. Once you have placed your palm on top of the club, do the same with your left thumb. Place it directly on top of the handle of the club. Next, interlock the left forefinger, and the right pinky. Nudge your right hand all the way towards the bottom of the grip. Now again, wrap the right palm all the way around the top of the grip. Don’t hold the grip of the club in your right palm. You should be able to cover up your left thumb with your right palm if you’ve done it correctly. You’ll see another V-shape being made where your right thumb and right forefinger meet. As a check, this V should be pointing directly at your right shoulder. If it doesn’t point at your right shoulder, rotate your hand on the grip so that it does. Your fingers should be giving the club most of the support it needs, NOT your palms.

Minehead & West Somerset Golf Club