Mill Green Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Mill Green Golf Club

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Golf Lessons at Mill Green Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Mill Green Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Mill Green Golf Club

With over thirty Golf course and leisure complexes, Crown Golf canprovide you with all you need for a truly memorable day’s golf. Each cluboffers a selection of services, from tuition and equipment hire to bars andrestaurants. Most clubs have function rooms available for events and partiesor business conferences of all sizes.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

One of the more interesting putting techniques in golf history is the so-called “hook stroke” of the great South African Bobby Locke who won more than 80 tournaments worldwide between the 1930s and ’50s including four British Opens. Many golfers have told me that Locke put hook spin on his putts which made them dive into the hole. That may have been what both they and Locke thought but I’m sure it was not the case.

I’ve seen photographs of Locke from which 1 can imagine that his stroke traveled on an in-to-out path with the putterface slightly closed through impact (Fig

Methods of Putting 45 ure 3.5.5). Such a stroke motion would make one think he was trying to hook puns and he may have actually put a very small amount of initial hook spin on his longer putts (his stroke proved both very consistent and very successful – Locke’s putting prowess was legendary). But I’m sure his putts were not spinning to the left or downward when they found the hole. They rolled in just like other golfers’ putts except they may have done so more consistently than any other player of his time. (In section 4.9 you’ll learn that the surface of the green takes all the spin off a putt within the first 20 percent of its roll.)

Bobby Locke was a great putter but his putts did not hook into the hole. preparing to roll a putt.

The Cut Stroke

While there’s no such thing as hooking putts it is possible to cut across the path of one’s putts which is precisely what Chi Chi Rodriguez did while winning more than 30 tournaments in his career. Chi Chi actually putted fairly well in the early years of his career consistently cutting across the ball by swinging the putterhead outside-to-inside across the line (Figure 3.5.6). But his putting failed him later on because a cut stroke makes putting more complex than it needs to be.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Technically the speed of a putt can be described and measured in quantitative terms as the velocity of motion (in units of inches or feet per second) in a given direction and the decay or decrease of velocity (the velocity profile) as the ball rolls to a stop. However since most golfers don’t think in technical terms on or off the course the actual velocity of a putt at any instant is neither very meaningful nor useful. As a result golfers talk about the speed of their putts as being too fast too slow or just about right as they approach the hole.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 61

But if you want to learn more about controlling your putting speed and making more putts you need to know more about speed than that. In fact you need to know how the rolling speed of your putts compares to their perfect or optimum speed around the hole. The speed of a putt depends on its length how fast it started where it is along its ball track how fast the green surface is and the slope (up down or sidehill) it is rolling on. For every putt there is an optimum speed that will optimize the percentage of putts that would both hit and stay in the hole. Therefore in this book as in my Scoring Game Schools we refer to a putt’s speed (while imagining its ball track) as how it relates to the optimum speed it should or could be rolling. For example as you can see in Figure 4.3.1 the left putt’s speed was too much as compared to the right putt’s speed which was virtually perfect. A detailed discussion of putting speed and optimum-speed ball tracks is in Chapter 7.

Green Speed

The speed of the surface of the green or green speed affects a ball’s roll in speed direction and amount of break. I ‘m sure you have heard greens referred to as “fast ” “slow ” “quick ” “slick ” or “sticky.” Technically the speed of the green is determined by the frictional characteristics of the surface of the green which is controlled primarily by the length type density and moisture content of the grass (more on this in Chapter 7). Golf course superintendents traditionally measure the speed characteristics of greens using a device called the Stimpmeter. much speed (left) and perfect speed (right) for two putts rolled on the same starting line.

The Stimpmeter developed years ago by a man named Edward Stimpson is a crude yet simple way to measure how far a ball will roll on a flat portion of a green when it is given a standard starting speed. The USGA-approved version of a

Stimpmeter is a solid straight piece of aluminum extruded at a 30-degree angle with an indentation near the top and a beveled bottom (Figure 4.3.2). The beveled bottom allows the Stimpmeter to sit low to the green surface and reduce the bounce of a ball rolling down the channel when it hits the green.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Mill Green Golf Club

At this point the right wrist is completely on top of the left wrist. Your hands are “through the ball”. You have continued to rotate around your spine, and you have tried to stop the left elbow on the imaginary line. This is the primary action for amateur golfer to increase power, while reducing slice.

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