Mile End Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Mile End Golf Club

About Mile End Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Mile End Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Mile End Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Mile End Golf Club

Mile End Golf Club is a full size 18 hole course covering 135 acres on the Welsh borders of Shropshire. The original 9-hole course opened in 1992 with the additional 9 holes being completed in May 1996. The preparation and maturing of the course on converted farmland incorporated many of the 15,000 trees as a picturesque feature of the design. Long term development has always been at the heart of the club’s policies and their careful design and layout of the course has brought many compliments from golfers and spectators alike. Particular features that are of appeal are the 3rd and 17th holes which both have greens protected by large pools. Another challenge is the two tiered green of the par 5, 14th hole which is the longest at 542 yards. The men’s course length is 6,194 yards (par 71) and 5,370 yards (par 72) for the ladies.

Mile End Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Develop Your Artistic Senses (Feel Touch Green-Reading) 327

It ‘s like any other problem in life: If you don’t admit that you have it you deny yourself the opportunity to eliminate it and the benefits of that elimination (in this case making more putts). Dealing honestly with reality is the first step to making it easier to see the true break as you stand over your putts examining the greens.

Two Green-Reading Problems

First let me clearly define the situation most golfers are in so there can be no misunderstanding. Based on my test data three circumstances are true:

As you can imagine poor green-reading is not something that can be fixed easily. As the three circumstances above now exist they self-perpetuate errors and compensations. (Hey it’s taken more than 400 years to even recognize that there is a problem!) And here ‘s the important fact to remember: Green-reading isn ‘t one problem it ‘s two problems:

You can read all the detail in Chapter 7 but the net effect of the two problems is that the compensations don’t quite make up for the full amount of underread. So most golfers today miss about 85 percent of their putts below the hole without realizing either that such a high percentage miss to the low side or why any one putt misses (they usually blame some mechanical error such as pulling the putt pushing the putt or not hitting it solidly). Then yours truly comes along and points out the mistake they are making. And what happens? Some of them try to correct the situation by solving problem 1 so they play more break miss high get confused and ultimately putt no better and possibly even worse. Or they work on problem 2 try putting accurately (without compensations) on the line they’ve read miss everything low and ultimately putt worse. The result is that in neither case do golfers learn to read the true break or start putting better. They don’t understand how to solve the problems and can’t stand the negative results when they try to.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Both of these methods are easier than other types of putting because they remove or at least reduce the difficulty of starting the ball on the desired line. But the pool method for sure (and to a certain extent the True Roller) is just as difficult as most other methods in transferring the correct speed to the ball.

This is a point worth repeating because most golfers don’t think enough about the speed of their putts. Rather they focus on line. If you are a “line” putter try putting with a pool cue or a True Roller and I promise you’ll learn to appreciate the importance of speed in making putts.

3.3 It Gets More Difficult

So we’ve disposed of two methods that no one can or should be allowed to use. What about some techniques that have been tried and in some cases are still in use?

Croquet-Style

Next on the “easiness” scale (which means it’s a little more difficult than the techniques above) is standing so you face the putting line and putt croquet-style between your legs. Yes this really has been used. Bob Duden and Bob Shave Jr. two PGA Tour pros who had been struggling with their putting used this technique back in the 1960s. I’ve never been sure whether the USGA banned this method because it was too easy too nontraditional or it just looked bad when viewed from behind. It certainly made putting easier because it gave the golfer the best view of the line before the putt and a clear view of what the ball was doing immediately after it started to roll.

Both of these views provide critically important feedback that golfers generally miss when putting in the conventional style (that is standing to the side of the line). Croquet-style putting has other benefits: It removes all rotational motion of the forearms (which opens and closes the putterface during conventional putting) it forces the wrists to remain solid (no breakdown) and it creates the perfect in-line stroke path straight down the intended putting line.

Mile End Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Mile End Golf Club

The follow through is now complete. The forearms are completely crossed, showing that you have gotten your hands through the ball. It may take a few days to get used to this new “left elbow close-to-side, forearms crossed-at-finish” concept. It will come though. It’s one of the best things you can do for your golf swing. No more blocking to the right or uncontrollably slicing the ball!

Mile End Golf Club