Mid Yorkshire Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Mid Yorkshire Golf Club

About Mid Yorkshire Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Mid Yorkshire Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Mid Yorkshire Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Mid Yorkshire Golf Club

At just 6300 yards, there are few places quite as good as the course at Mid Yorkshire Golf Club for catering for golfers of all levels of ability. Whether you are a relative newcomer to the sport, or the more discerning golfer, we guarantee that you’ll love the endless challenges you can test yourself against on this fine, championship standard course. We are situated ½ mile south of M62 junctions 33 and 32A at Ferrybridge and just off the A1, which make us easily accessible from the North, South, East and West. Leeds and Doncaster are a 20 minute drive away, York and Wakefield are 30 minutes and Hull, Huddersfield and Sheffield are all well less than an hour from the Club.

Mid Yorkshire Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

When your face angle is pointing left of your Aimline it is closed (again for right-handed golfers). The “open” and “closed” terminology reverses for lefthanders. You must understand and remember that your putterface angle and putter path arc completely independent of each other.

Impact Point

Your impact point refers to the center of the contact area between your ball and putter on the putterface (Figure 4.2.3). For each and every putt there is one unique impact point which sometimes centers on a single dimple but more often several dimples plus an edge of one or more dimples. After many putts your many impact points will form your impact pattern (Figure 4.2.4) which is very important to the success of your putting. Aim path face angle and impact pattern are four of the 15 building blocks fundamental to your putting stroke mechanics. They describe and define how you move your putterhead and how your putterhead moves through the impact zone determines how well you roll your ball relative to your Aimline.

4.3 Defining Speed

Putt Speed

The velocity with which a ball moves along the green can be referred to in several ways. Some golfers refer to this as the rolling speed or speed of the putt. Some golfers talk about the pace of a putt while others talk about how fast a putt is moving. It would be nice if we all could mean and understand the same thing when referring to speed.

Mid Yorkshire Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

It reminds me of a practice putting green filled with golfers. One golfer is prac ticing a new grip. Another has widened his stance and is bending over more than he used to while his friend is trying the split-hand grip he saw on television. An other golfer is trying to learn a short backswing and “pop” stroke. All these golfers practicing something that they actually did just before they happened to make a putt hoping it will help them make another one.

And that is what you see if you look at many putting greens today. Golfers practicing practicing and practicing – who knows what they are practicing? – all hoping their putting will improve. Some of them practice a different thing every day and use a different stroke in every round. Some golfers even use several differ ent strokes during one round. Yes sir-ee they remind me of a bunch of pigeons!

Something else you need to think about before actually beginning to work on your stroke are the answers to a few questions. They are important questions but only if you want to know just how good your putting can get: (1) How good are the world’s best putters? (2) How well do you putt now? (3) How good can one get at putting? (4) How good will your putting be in the future?

Let me answer these as best I can:

I believe the best putters in the world are playing on the PGA Tour. My proof is the results of the first two World Putting Championships where the Tour pros were seriously challenged by some Senior Tour players several LPGA Tour players and a number of amateurs both young and old. However the PGA Tour players placed higher as a group than any other.

Also my data on the percentage of putts holed from different distances shows that the PGA Tour players lead all other groups. Don’t think that you can look at the statistics quoted in the newspapers and find this information because the number that the papers publish (provided by the Tour) simply show how many putts the players average on greens hit in regulation which is affected by the quality of their iron shots (the better the iron play the shorter their putts). And these are the new putting stats. Years ago the Tour’s statistics measured putts taken per green which was influenced by how many greens players missed and how consistently they chipped close to the hole (again leaving them shorter putts). Neither of these statistics measures the quality of a player’s putting because both are strongly influenced by the quality of different shots (approaches and chips).

The true measure of the Tour pros’ putting is indicated by the percentage of putts they make (“convert”) based solely on the length of the putts (shown in Figure 1.4.1 page 7). The shaded curve is data on PGA Tour players taken between the years 1977 and 1992 and shows the spread between the best and worst conversion percentages. It has now been almost 10 years since we measured how well the pros putt and the Pelz Golf Institute is in the process of repeating this test. We hope we’ll find that the percentages have changed in recent years (they remained fairly consistent in the period from ’87 to ’92) as the conditions of greens improve and as players improve their skills (and perhaps as some of our teaching is taking effect).

Mid Yorkshire Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Mid Yorkshire Golf Club

Here is a view from the front. The goal of this photo is to show that there is no lateral movement. Simply rotating your right shoulder around your spine.*Please note that you should NOT be cocking your wrists at the end of your backswing. While this may add a bit of power, it will totally throw off your timing. The results of a wrist cock are slices, hooks, fat shots, etc.

Mid Yorkshire Golf Club