Mid Sussex Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Mid Sussex Golf Club

About Mid Sussex Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Mid Sussex Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Waterhall Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Mid Sussex Golf Club

Designed to high specifications by renowned course architect David Williams and former winner of the European Open, Andrew Murray, Mid Sussex Golf Club first opened its doors to the public in 1995. Since then we have been fortunate to host such events as the Sussex Mid-Age Championship, the Sussex Seniors Open and a number of County Matches and Events, which is a great tribute to the quality of the course.

Mid Sussex Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

There are many acceptable ways to hold a putter such as the “reverse-overlap ” “finger-down-the-shaft ” “split-grip ” “equal-hand ” “push-hand ” and “baseball” grips (Figure 1L6.11). But without seeing you putt I can only suggest that you test and evaluate a few grips as you work to improve your stroke mechanics. Sometimes changing a grip can affect the path and face angle of your putter through impact; more on that in the next chapter.

Unusual Grips

Many players have found less conventional grips that work for them. These grips may be different but they have proven comfortable and consistent. Take for ex ample Corey Pavin s “opposed-palm ” grip (Figure 11.6.12). Corey s problem used to be missing to the left. Ile pulled putts until he turned his left hand as far left on the putter as possible which stopped the pulls because he couldn’t turn his left forearm any farther left during his stroke. But then he started pushing putts to the right. The solution was obvious: Turn the right hand as far to the right as possible. So with his palms “opposed ” he became a very fine putter winning the 1995 U.S. Open at Shinnecock Hills putting that way.

While I said above that no one grip is best for everyone “left-hand-low” (which really should be called “lead-hand-low”) or “left-hand-low clamp” is one that I suggest every golfer try (Figure 11.6.13). Left-hand-low places the right forearm on-line with or slightly below the ideal forearm plane taking the right arm out of the “power position” and allowing the left arm to lead or pull the stroke through. Perhaps the best recommendation I know of for the left-hand-low grip is the list of Tour professionals who are now putting or have putted this way.

Establish Your Practice Framework 253

Occasionally uninformed golfers mistakenly refer to left-hand-low as “crosshanded” putting but a true crossed-handed grip (which I never recommend to anyone) is shown in Figure 11.6.14. Left-hand-low doesn’t work only for the pros. Only four years after taking up the game a young man named Bob Zeigenfuss (Figure 11.6.15) made the world finals of the 1997 World Putting Championship putting left-hand-low.

Mid Sussex Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

To examine the putting stroke of vertical pendulum A look at Figure 4.6.9 where the golfer’s hands hang vertically below his shoulders. On the left of this photo the attached putter hangs vertically below the hands which looks a bit strange. But stay with me. If the golfer now swings his arms straight hack along the line of this intended putt lets them relax and then swings them through – guided simply by the force of gravity – the putterface would swing perfectly along the line of this putt (Figure 4.6.9A’). This path is purely in-line along the Aimline just like pendulum A with no side forces or path curvature.

By starting with the putterface square to the line and using this pure-in-line stroke the ball would have to start rolling on that line. The pendulum swings this way because gravity is the only force acting on the stroke: There are no rotating forces to turn the putterface away from the target line and no side forces to push the putter off the straight Aimline path.

Now imagine a minor modification to this putter a lightweight but much longer face (Figure 4.6.9A`’). With this change the putter would still swing perfectly in-line beneath the shoulders and there still is nothing to cause rotation or circular motion in the stroke. In Figure 4.6.9A’ we’ve added a lightweight but rigid connection from the grip to the putterface near its toe. Assuming this connection is truly lightweight and doesn’t change the putter’s balance the swing path still would not change still would not rotate and would naturally continue to swing in-line along the straight line path beneath the shoulders.

Finally having seen how this putter swings with both shafts now look what happens when the vertical part of the shaft is removed in Figure 4.6.9A”. By removing the original vertical shaft (which hung under the hands) and the back of the putterface we have turned this into a normal-looking putter which still swings in a pure-in-line path as before. This face (again assuming the putter was balanced perfectly) will not rotate open or closed and will not swing or curve around the body. The natural swinging motion of this putter will be purely in-line along a line exactly parallel to his shoulder line. In other words this putter path will track right down the Aimline the intended line of the putt.

4.7 A Pure-In-Line Stroke Keeps the Putterface Square

Section 4.6 should prove to you that a pure simple pendulum can swing in three different motions all of which can relate to a putting stroke. The pendulum of a putting stroke (assuming the golfer has a pendulum and doesn ‘t hit with his hands or wrists or move his body) is the pendulum formed between his suspension point (between his shoulders) and his hands (Figure 4.7.1). And it is this position of a golfer’s hands the angle of his pendulum relative to vertical that determines not only the natural swing path of his putterhead but also the behavior of the putterface angle relative to the Aimline. (Note: your elbows and forearms don’t have to be under your shoulders just your hands.)

As shown on the bottom in Figure 4.7.2 when the golfer’s hands (pendulum

Mid Sussex Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Mid Sussex Golf Club

As you can see in the image to the left, the back remains straight while bending over to the ball. All of the bending is done at the hips. Bending at the waist and keeping a straight back will promote great ball flight and consistency. The relationship between the arms and chest has not changed.

Mid Sussex Golf Club