Mickleover Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Mickleover Golf Club

About Mickleover Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Mickleover Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Mickleover Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Mickleover Golf Club

A warm welcome to Mickleover Golf Club and to our website. Whether you are a member, a regular visitor or planning your first trip, we hope you will find these pages helpful and informative.Founded in 1923, Mickleover Golf Club has a reputation for being a tough but fair challenge despite it’s moderate length. With views across the Trent Valley, the course is well maintained while the clubhouse offers a warm and friendly welcome to all visitors.Mickleover Golf Club is situated 2 miles to the west of Derby in the village of Mickleover. It is easily reached from all parts of the country.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Hold Your Finish

Greg Norman understands that he must hold his finish when putting (Figure 5.6.2). Just watch him: Whether he is putting to win a tournament or putting on a practice green he always holds his finish as he watches the ball roll. He learns a little hit about his putting his stroke and the green from every putt.

Compare this to the common golfer ‘s reaction to a putt (Figure 5.6.3). The ball is barely struck and he is reacting talking complaining letting go of the putter standing up and turning away. Before the ball has stopped rolling he has lost all feeling for the stroke that moved it and there is nothing left to correlate with the result. Not only hasn’t his putt found the hole (a safe bet) but the golfer hasn’t learned anything from it. By holding his finish and watching his putts Norman learns a lot about his putting. By looking away and complaining while the ball is still rolling most amateurs learn little to nothing about theirs. And by the way if you ever learn as much about your putting as Greg has about his you’ll probably win lots of tournaments too.

You can only practice and learn to improve putting touch in the present in the now. You must be on the green watching the ball roll to a stop while retaining the

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 125 feel of the stroke that caused that result. If you think this requires a lot of attention or is difficult to do it is not. Simply by making it a habit to hold the finish of every putting stroke and watching your putts stop you will learn a little about your touch with every putt you make for the rest of your golf career. Then as you putt on the course or on the practice green your touch will become a little bit better with every roll. All it takes is learning what size and feel of stroke make the ball do what you want it to do. And after a few thousand watched strokes and a few thousand little bits of learning the results start to add up and your putting touch begins to show dramatic improvement.

Don’t Think Repeat

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Another unusual – I wouldn’t go so far as to call it unique – putting style was put to good use for many years by Billy Casper. He locked his arms against his stomach and powered his putts purely by hinging his wrists (Figure 3.5.7). Once again Casper no longer uses this method and steers others away from it saying that it took far more time patience and practice to keep sharp than the pendulum stroke that is now popular among Tour pros.

However in his behalf I have to say that Billy won a lot of tournaments putting with his wrists so you know it can be done. I caution you though that you will have to devote yourself to hours and hours of practice for years and years and also play under enough pressure to learn how to handle the effects of adrenaline the way he did.

The Block Stroke Here’s a method that sounds almost ridiculous: Aim the putterface a foot to the left of your target on a straight putt then block the ball toward the hole. That’s what Lee Trevino has done throughout his career (Figure 3.5.8).

Methods of Putting 47 “block-strokes” better than Lee Trevino.

Every part of Lee’s game is built on aiming to the left then blocking his swing through impact so it’s little surprise he does this when putting too. In my opinion Trevino is another great player who achieved greatness in spite of his putting not because of it. And he agrees: Lee told me that if he had putted as well as Jack Nicklaus you might never have heard of the Golden Bear.

I believe him. He has always been a great ball-striker (the best I ever measured) and he putted reasonably well but never great. He is a very talented player who did well with a somewhat complex putting stroke. But he would have putted better and won more with a better (which to me means simpler) putting stroke.

Next on my list of strokes (still moving toward simplicity) is the “blend” stroke a combination of the power stroke and a pure pendulum stroke usually employing a slight wrist hinge. A number of fine players putt this way including Brad Faxon Lee Janzen D. A. Weibring and Ben Crenshaw (Figure 3.5.9). Every one of these players is a wonderful putter and every one uses a predominantly pendulum motion with just a little bit of power provided by the hand muscles.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Mickleover Golf Club

Here is a view from the front. The goal of this photo is to show that there is no lateral movement. Simply rotating your right shoulder around your spine.*Please note that you should NOT be cocking your wrists at the end of your backswing. While this may add a bit of power, it will totally throw off your timing. The results of a wrist cock are slices, hooks, fat shots, etc.

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