Mendip Spring Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Mendip Spring Golf Club

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Golf Lessons at Mendip Spring Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Mendip Spring Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

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Entry is now open for the Mendip Spring Golf Club Open competitions 2006The Mendip Spring Golf Club Open Weeekend 2006. The date is the weekend of Saturday/Sunday the 3rd/4th June. There will be seperate Men’s & Ladies 4BBB Stableford competitions on the Saturday.The Sunday will have a Mixed 4BBB Stableford competition.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Look at the color photographs (see insert in the center) of some of the best putters in the world. From George Archer and Ben Crenshaw probably the two best ever to Brad Faxon Loren Roberts Lee Janzen Dave Stockton Bob Charles and Phil Mickelson each has a beautiful smooth flowing and – most important – rhythmic putting stroke. Each one has a rhythm that tends to be the same day after day week after week year in and year out for all of their putts. if you think these guys are just lucky when they putt then you haven’ t watched them. They all have reasonably good mechanical stroke actions (although none are perfect) so their putters remain stable through impact. And they all have great rhythm. Even on their bad putting days they almost make most of their putts burning the edges of the cups. The reason for their consistency? Rhythm.

Rhythm is the glue of these great strokes but these guys don’t own the patent on rhythm. As you will see in section 11.3 anyone can improve his or her rhythm and I’ve never seen anyone who hasn’t putted better for it. Good setup alignment touch feel green-reading and stroke mechanics are all necessary for good putting. But without a constant and repeatable rhythm preferably one that is in sync with the natural cadence of your body you will never become a great putter. Never. And that’s a fact.

Green-Reading the 15th Building Block

7.1 Houston – We Have a Problem

When the world-famous phrase “Houston – We have a problem” was transmitted from the Apollo 13 spacecraft back to earth it signified one of the most profound understatements of all time. It came as a calm voice from a spacecraft on its way to the moon to the Houston ground-control command center from an astronaut who while petrified with fear understood that he had a real problem (there had been an explosion on board his spacecraft; Figure 7.1.1). However no one on Earth understood the magnitude of the problem. Ground control had lost all normal monitor and status signals and nothing they saw on their control-system panels made any sense. They were sure the crazy array of warning signals and lights out-of-tolerance levels and emergency-warning systems had to be some malfunction of their ground-control systems. The ground controllers thought “This can’t be real because for these readings to be correct the spacecraft would have to explode.”

I’m not an astronaut but I did work for NASA during the years of the Mercury

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Impact Point

Your impact point refers to the center of the contact area between your ball and putter on the putterface (Figure 4.2.3). For each and every putt there is one unique impact point which sometimes centers on a single dimple but more often several dimples plus an edge of one or more dimples. After many putts your many impact points will form your impact pattern (Figure 4.2.4) which is very important to the success of your putting. Aim path face angle and impact pattern are four of the 15 building blocks fundamental to your putting stroke mechanics. They describe and define how you move your putterhead and how your putterhead moves through the impact zone determines how well you roll your ball relative to your Aimline.

4.3 Defining Speed

Putt Speed

The velocity with which a ball moves along the green can be referred to in several ways. Some golfers refer to this as the rolling speed or speed of the putt. Some golfers talk about the pace of a putt while others talk about how fast a putt is moving. It would be nice if we all could mean and understand the same thing when referring to speed.

Technically the speed of a putt can be described and measured in quantitative terms as the velocity of motion (in units of inches or feet per second) in a given direction and the decay or decrease of velocity (the velocity profile) as the ball rolls to a stop. However since most golfers don’t think in technical terms on or off the course the actual velocity of a putt at any instant is neither very meaningful nor useful. As a result golfers talk about the speed of their putts as being too fast too slow or just about right as they approach the hole.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 61

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Mendip Spring Golf Club

Wrap your right fingers lightly around the handle of the club Alternative to the interlock grip (The overlap grip)

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