Mendip Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Mendip Golf Club

About Mendip Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Mendip Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Mendip Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Mendip Golf Club

The Mendip Golf Club has come a long way since relocating to its current site back in 1908. From its early beginnings as a nine hole layout it has been continuously improved over the years into the superb eighteen hole par 71 course that it is today.With its fairways of springy downland turf, “Mendip” boasts lies that some golfers can only dream about. The excellent greens are maintained to a very high standard, many having pronounced borrows which need careful reading.Located on the North slope of the Mendips, 15 miles south-west of Bath, the highest point on the course is almost 1000 feet above sea level on the 3rd fairway. Looking around on a fine day, visitors can enjoy unparalleled views over seven counties, including the Welsh mountains, spectacular King Arthur’s Vale of Avalon, mysterious Glastonbury Tor, and across to Bridgwater Bay and Exmoor. 18 holes, 6381 yards. S.S.S. 70.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Touch feel and green-reading must be learned outdoors on putting greens (real or artificial). Again good feedback is beneficial and you must get into the habit of

376 Wrap-Up evaluating the proper aspect of your results to provide it (Chapters 12 and 13 detail the drills and games to play).

It has been both interesting and informative to watch and experience how the staff at the Pelz Golf Institute learns what to expect balls to do on sloping greens. The more we test measure and identify slopes the easier it becomes for us to recognize them in our mind’s eye the next time we see them (before we even measure them). The more we measure and quantify green speeds the better we get at estimating how fast they are and how much putts will break on them before we actually roll any putts (Figure 15.3.2).

Spending time in this environment has not only improved my green-reading skills it has convinced me that all golfers can learn to read greens more accurately given a little time feedback and reference information. While my staff is constantly refining and learning about how golfers play the game we also see our concepts constantly being proven in our schools. As they work more and more with the tilt-greens True Rollers and other feedback devices they have begun to see and feel in their subconscious minds that reference slopes speed evaluations and focusing on visible break really does take hold and work. Even some of our nongolfing personnel have learned to read greens pretty well.

The learning environment is the key: Once you have learned how to learn about putting the “learning-ness” of your practice environment becomes the key to your putting improvement.

Wrap-Up 377

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

4.5 Power Source

Your power source is the part of your body that supplies the power to control and move the putter through the impact zone of your stroke. The muscles you use to control your putter determine your putting power source. The three most common power sources used in putting are: (1) the small muscles of the fingers hands wrists and forearms; (2) the arms and shoulders; and (3) body motion.

Fingers Hands and Wrists

Most golfers control their putting with the small muscles of their hands wrists and forearms. These are the muscles that control most of the things we do in life – hitting things twisting things moving things – so using our hands and forearms in golf is instinctive and therefore feels natural to us. But instinct and natu

68 The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics ralness don’ t necessarily mean correct. And in fact trying to find a way to putt that is both initially comfortable and natural usually leads to disaster.

Supplying the power which determines how fast and how far your putts will roll from the muscles of your wrists hands and fingers (Figure 4.5.1) is bad. Wrist motion (hinging) causes putterface angle variations and hand and wrist muscles lend to tighten up and not work well under even slight pressure. But powering your putts with these muscles also brings an added complication: It’s not had all the time.

You can practice putting this way for years and as long as you putt on the course exactly the way you do in practice – relaxed and calm – things will be reasonably okay. But wait until you get really excited. When your heart begins to beat faster because a putt really matters your body naturally produces adrenaline which makes all of your muscles stronger. Then all your practice goes out the window because the muscles that control your putting power are now stronger than they ever were on the putting green. Even if your stroke feels the way it did in practice the adrenaline-induced extra power will cause it to provide the wrong amount of energy to your putts and produce bad results on the course.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Mendip Golf Club

Now just line everything up with that item and fire away. This method won’t cure all of your alignment problems, but it does give you a simple way to assure that you are on the right path. Many students have the habit of lining up way left or way right of the target. When the ball goes where they are “aiming”, they think they have a problem. If your ball consistently goes left or right of target, but flies straight, then your problem is your alignment. Try this simple method before every shot on the course and you’ll definitely drop a few strokes.

Mendip Golf Club