Mcdonald Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Mcdonald Golf Club

About Mcdonald Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Mcdonald Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Mcdonald Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Mcdonald Golf Club

Set in the heart of the Buchan countryside, midway between the fascinating fishing trail and the historic castle country, this scenic eighteen hole golf course provides a memorable golfing experience for all standards of golfer. The parkland course is named after its benefactor Sir James McDonald who, in 1926, gifted the old woodlands to the people of Ellon. The original nine hole course wends its way through this magnificent forest with its stately trees and beautiful rhododendron bushes. Even though the forest is very close to the town it is alive with wildlife and if you are very lucky you may catch a glimpse of our native red squirrel. The well established first nine has been carefully constructed to maintain the parkland character. It has a natural stream that twists and turns across the course and features on almost every hole.

McDonald Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Yes dimples can affect putting. Or more precisely making contact on the edges of dimples can affect your putting. It’s not a large effect and it’s even less significant the harder you strike your putts. Also the effect doesn’t occur every time because if you place your ball down on the green in random orientations you’re more likely to strike the ball somewhere that won’t have an effect – on the spherical

212 Wind Lopsided Balls Dimples Rain Sleet and Snow surface across the flat of a dimple or close to the flat of the dimple. Still the possibility does exist and there is a simple way to avoid it altogether.

Having marked your ball with its Balance-line (see section 9.9) rotate it until you locate the largest spherical surface (non-dimple) area on the Balance-line then circle it: This becomes your Dot-Spot (Figure 9.10.7). Set your ball so the Dot-Spot is at the back of the ball (away from the hole where it will be struck by the putter) when your Balance-line is aimed precisely along your Aimline. That way when you make contact there will never be a dimple effect.

9.11 Rain Sleet and Snow: Are We Having Fun Yet?

As I warned you at the beginning of this chapter the information here truly could be more than many golfers want to know. But please don ‘t think that I’m trying to make putting seem more difficult. You don’t have to carry any of this information with you onto the course. You don’t have to think about it ever again if you don’t want to. But someday the fact that you read something about putting in the wind may help you. Or perhaps you’ll think “Maybe I’ll try that Pelz tip and turn the ball so I don’t hit the edge of a dimple.” It can’t hurt.

You’ve been putting all these years without thinking of any of these effects I’ve mentioned. So why do I bring them up? So you will stop beating yourself up every time you miss a putt. Golfers usually blame themselves for a miss even when it isn’t their stroke that’s at fault. D want you to stop doing that because this game is hard enough without it. Save the self “butt-kicking” for the errors you really do make and deserve!

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Rather we talk about the “Aimline” you intend to start the ball rolling on the “ini tial line” you actually start the ball on and where the “ball track” goes after that.

Ball-Hole Line and Target Line

When we talk about the “ball-hole” line for any putt we mean the straight line between where the ball sits (before you putt it) and the hole (Figure 4.1.2). How ever because the hole is always your ultimate target some golfers call this their

“target line.” But many golfers use “target line” to describe the line between their ball and the point at which they are aiming the line on which they hope to start the putt rolling. But you seldom try both to aim and start your ball rolling along a straight line at the hole and expect it to keep rolling on that line because most putts break at least a little bit.

Therefore it is clearer to refer to this direction as your hall-hole line. Also realize that the ball-hole line extends forever in both directions (as shown) and that it is the ball-hole line that most golfers walk to and stand on behind their ball as they first try to read the break of their putts.

Standing behind the ball trying to read the green most golfers decide how much they think the putt is going to break and then where they are going to aim. They select a point or a direction where they intend to start their putt and we refer to the line from the ball to that point or direction as the “Aimline ” or desired initial starting line of the putt (Figure 4.1.3). It’s best called the Aimline because it is the line along which you align your body feet and (it’s hoped) your stroke because you want to start the ball rolling along that line. It ‘s where you’re aiming. If everything was figured properly the ball starts on your Aimline and will roll the proper speed and break (because of the slope of the green) gently into the cup.

The entire path that your putt takes is the “ball track” (left side of Figure 4.1.4). It may remind you of the “action track” sometimes used on television to show how a ball has traveled. The distances between the balls on the track indicate how fast (relatively) the putt is traveling: Farther apart means it is rolling faster; closer together and it is rolling slower. A detailed ball track provides an accurate understanding of a putt’s entire motion – both where and how fast it was going – better even than the same putt recorded and played back on videotape.

Mcdonald Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Mcdonald Golf Club

Here is a picture at full speed. The wrists have completed their roll through the ball. The left elbow is close to the body, and about ready to break, allowing for follow through.Now, I’ll take you into the follow-through. This will be simple. Basically just keep turning around your spine. If you have flipped your wrists correctly, you won’t have to bother too much with the follow through. However, there is a basic position that you should be in when you finish the swing. You should be facing the target, and your right and left forearms should be crossed. Your right forearm should be closest to you, and the club should be out towards left field.

Mcdonald Golf Club