Matlock Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Matlock Golf Club

About Matlock Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Matlock Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Matlock Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Matlock Golf Club

The Course is situated on Matlock Moor, about one and a half miles North of Matlock on the Chesterfield Road, rising to 850 feet above sea level. Designed and laid out in 1907 by that famous Professional, the late Tom Williamson, the course generally speaking, calls for accuracy rather than long hitting.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

If you want an answer to question 2 – “How well do you putt?” – you must measure your percentage of putts holed from each distance. You can do this but it will take some effort. You have to record the distance of each putt on your scorecard as you move around the course and indicate those you hole. After 10 to 15

Problems on the Greens 29 rounds (and at least 5 to 10 putts from each distance) you’ll begin to be able to plot your own conversion chart and compare it to those of the pros.

As for question 3 – “How good can one get at putting?” – the answer depends on a number of things: the quality of the greens how well a player reads those greens and the quality of the player’s stroke and touch. Although none of these questions can be answered definitively in this book I assure you that all of the above are getting better all the time. As greens improve putting strokes improve and golfers learn to read greens better a higher percentage of putts from every distance will be made in the future.

Finally “Flow good will your putting be in the future?” That depends on your ability to learn the mechanics of a better putting stroke your ability to learn better putting feel and touch your ability to learn to read greens better and your ability to produce the right stroke at the right time. Depending on your lifestyle your determination and intensity your focus your self-discipline and practice habits and your ability to learn only you can provide this answer.

For most golfers to improve their scores it is often easier to reduce their number of three-putts than it is to increase their number of one-putts. This is generally true for golfers with handicaps greater than 20 although it is even true for some very fine lower-handicap players. As you can see in Figure 2.9.1 the length of the most frequent first putt on greens hit from outside 60 yards is 38 feet. (This distance varies a little with the handicap of the players measured but obviously there are many more long first putts than short ones.) This figure also shows that the most frequent first putt to follow shots hit from inside 60 yards is an 18-footer. If you combine these two curves and add in all the second and third putts that become necessary after the first putt is missed you can see a typical value for the number of putts of each length golfers face per round over a season of golf (Figure 2.9.2).

Now look at the conversion curve for this group of 15- to 25-handicap golfers (Figure 2.9.3) and the frequency with which they three-putt versus the putt distance (Figure 2.9.4). By comparing these data you can see the importance of making short putts as well as learning that you can save several strokes per round by eliminating three-putts from outside 30 feet. This means that you shouldn’t practice only short putts; the long ones are also important. And you must stop three-putting those long ones if you want to be a good putter.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Before getting into the mechanics of the putting stroke I’ll define some vocabulary which will help keep things simple and easy to understand throughout the book. In our Scoring Game Schools we routinely use words or phrases that you may not be familiar with. We do this because we’ve found that many golfers refer to the same things using different terms and sometimes use the same terms to describe different things.

Obviously this can lead to unnecessary confusion and disagreement. It helps to be more explicit in how you describe and define some of these concepts. For ex ample my staff and I never talk about “putting to there ” or putting “that way.”

Rather we talk about the “Aimline” you intend to start the ball rolling on the “ini tial line” you actually start the ball on and where the “ball track” goes after that.

Ball-Hole Line and Target Line

When we talk about the “ball-hole” line for any putt we mean the straight line between where the ball sits (before you putt it) and the hole (Figure 4.1.2). How ever because the hole is always your ultimate target some golfers call this their

“target line.” But many golfers use “target line” to describe the line between their ball and the point at which they are aiming the line on which they hope to start the putt rolling. But you seldom try both to aim and start your ball rolling along a straight line at the hole and expect it to keep rolling on that line because most putts break at least a little bit.

Therefore it is clearer to refer to this direction as your hall-hole line. Also realize that the ball-hole line extends forever in both directions (as shown) and that it is the ball-hole line that most golfers walk to and stand on behind their ball as they first try to read the break of their putts.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Matlock Golf Club

The follow through is now complete. The forearms are completely crossed, showing that you have gotten your hands through the ball. It may take a few days to get used to this new “left elbow close-to-side, forearms crossed-at-finish” concept. It will come though. It’s one of the best things you can do for your golf swing. No more blocking to the right or uncontrollably slicing the ball!

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