Marriott Worsley Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Marriott Worsley Park Golf Club

About Marriott Worsley Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Marriott Worsley Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Marriott Worsley Park Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Marriott Worsley Park Golf Club

A vision of Victorian country elegance, this 200-acre former home of the Duke of Bridgewater is now site of the Marriott Worsley Park Hotel & Country Club Manchester. For business travellers, pleasure seekers or meeting planners, this luxury hotel in Manchester offers the elements for success. Spacious, well appointed guest rooms cradle you in comfort and are wired for high-speed Internet access. Appetites are quickly sated at Brindley’s, specializing in traditional English fare with a twist; at Sports & Spikes, serving hearty fare, light bites and snacks; or at the Chimney Bar for afternoon tea or cocktails. Here, a championship golf course challenges you to rise to the occasion, whilst the day spa coaxes you into blissful relaxation. There’s also a pool and fitness centre to enjoy.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Defining How the Ball Rolls

Before getting into the mechanics of the putting stroke I’ll define some vocabulary which will help keep things simple and easy to understand throughout the book. In our Scoring Game Schools we routinely use words or phrases that you may not be familiar with. We do this because we’ve found that many golfers refer to the same things using different terms and sometimes use the same terms to describe different things.

Obviously this can lead to unnecessary confusion and disagreement. It helps to be more explicit in how you describe and define some of these concepts. For ex ample my staff and I never talk about “putting to there ” or putting “that way.”

Rather we talk about the “Aimline” you intend to start the ball rolling on the “ini tial line” you actually start the ball on and where the “ball track” goes after that.

Ball-Hole Line and Target Line

When we talk about the “ball-hole” line for any putt we mean the straight line between where the ball sits (before you putt it) and the hole (Figure 4.1.2). How ever because the hole is always your ultimate target some golfers call this their

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Next down the easiness scale comes the “pop stroke ” which was used quite successfully by both Gary Player and Johnny Miller early in their careers. The backstroke is shorter than normal and there’s virtually no follow-through after impact so the ball is “popped ” or jabbed forward (Figure 3.5.4). Neither Miller nor Player stuck with the pop stroke through his career because they said it lacked consistency; when I’ve asked them about this method neither would recommend it. However both won many tournaments popping their putts so it may not be as bad as they recall.

The pop stroke does have one advantage and that is it keeps the putterface angle essentially square at all times which is a good thing. However it uses the muscles of the hands and arms for power and is therefore a difficult method to use if you want to develop really good touch.

One of the more interesting putting techniques in golf history is the so-called “hook stroke” of the great South African Bobby Locke who won more than 80 tournaments worldwide between the 1930s and ’50s including four British Opens. Many golfers have told me that Locke put hook spin on his putts which made them dive into the hole. That may have been what both they and Locke thought but I’m sure it was not the case.

I’ve seen photographs of Locke from which 1 can imagine that his stroke traveled on an in-to-out path with the putterface slightly closed through impact (Fig

Methods of Putting 45 ure 3.5.5). Such a stroke motion would make one think he was trying to hook puns and he may have actually put a very small amount of initial hook spin on his longer putts (his stroke proved both very consistent and very successful – Locke’s putting prowess was legendary). But I’m sure his putts were not spinning to the left or downward when they found the hole. They rolled in just like other golfers’ putts except they may have done so more consistently than any other player of his time. (In section 4.9 you’ll learn that the surface of the green takes all the spin off a putt within the first 20 percent of its roll.)

Bobby Locke was a great putter but his putts did not hook into the hole. preparing to roll a putt.

The Cut Stroke

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Marriott Worsley Park Golf Club

Here is a picture at full speed. The wrists have completed their roll through the ball. The left elbow is close to the body, and about ready to break, allowing for follow through.Now, I’ll take you into the follow-through. This will be simple. Basically just keep turning around your spine. If you have flipped your wrists correctly, you won’t have to bother too much with the follow through. However, there is a basic position that you should be in when you finish the swing. You should be facing the target, and your right and left forearms should be crossed. Your right forearm should be closest to you, and the club should be out towards left field.

Marriott Worsley Park Golf Club