Lowestoft Rookery Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Lowestoft Rookery Park Golf Club

About Lowestoft Rookery Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Lowestoft Rookery Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Lowestoft Rookery Park Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Lowestoft Rookery Park Golf Club

There is historical evidence that the game of golf was played in Lowestoft before 1891 according to a book chronicling the history of the Lowestoft and Rookery Park Golf Clubs. The Club moved from its original home, The Denes, to Pakefield in 1906 and finally to its present home at Carlton Colville in 1975. The name was changed to Rookery Park Golf Club, the name coming from the farm on which the course was built.

Lowestoft (Rookery) Park Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Establish Your Practice Framework 255 cycle accident a number of years ago. He watched the 1996 WPC competition on ESPN and said “I can do that ” so he bought a putter and tried putting for the first time. In July 1997 he won the putting championship at his local club then qualified regionally for the WPC Finals. He finished 155th (in a field of 308) in the 1997 World Putting Championship beating a number of PGA Tour professionals along the way. Ask him how he does it and Rocky answers “Just like you do: I grab my putter and put the best stroke I can muster on every putt.” I can tell you from studying his stroke that it’s a good one. His “big-toe-right-foot ” grip definitely keeps his putter square through impact!

256 Establish Your Practice Framework

Putter Grips

The size shape and orientation of the grip on your putter should be appropriate for the size of your hands while allowing repeatable placement of your hands to encourage your best possible stroke (promoting solid contact and a square putter-face through the impact zone). Satisfying these requirements should come before worrying about the factors most golfers look for in a grip – how it looks how it feels and what pros use it.

Appropriate size means allowing for a comfortable hold and a feeling of control. The grip should not be so small that the fingers wrap all the way around to the opposite side and interfere with placement of the hands; nor should it be so large that it cannot be held securely.

Shape is not just a matter of personal preference. The Rules of Golf say that a grip may not aid in the placement of the fingers or hands. They also state that the shape must be symmetrical as it runs down the shaft and that flat areas are allowed as long as they extend along the shaft axis (so there can he no twisting undulating or notches). Many golfers prefer a flat section along the top of the shaft giving them a way to comfortably place their thumbs and position their palms parallel to the face. Such a grip is fine – and this is my rule not the USGA’s – as long as it allows your natural hand position to swing the putter square to the Aimline through impact. In fact testing the Tour pros I ‘ve found that quite a few putted better when the flat side of the grip was rotated 90 degrees (toward the target side) so the flat surface is parallel to the putterface and fits against the palm of the leading hand.

Lowestoft Rookery Park Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Both of these methods are easier than other types of putting because they remove or at least reduce the difficulty of starting the ball on the desired line. But the pool method for sure (and to a certain extent the True Roller) is just as difficult as most other methods in transferring the correct speed to the ball.

This is a point worth repeating because most golfers don’t think enough about the speed of their putts. Rather they focus on line. If you are a “line” putter try putting with a pool cue or a True Roller and I promise you’ll learn to appreciate the importance of speed in making putts.

3.3 It Gets More Difficult

So we’ve disposed of two methods that no one can or should be allowed to use. What about some techniques that have been tried and in some cases are still in use?

Croquet-Style

Next on the “easiness” scale (which means it’s a little more difficult than the techniques above) is standing so you face the putting line and putt croquet-style between your legs. Yes this really has been used. Bob Duden and Bob Shave Jr. two PGA Tour pros who had been struggling with their putting used this technique back in the 1960s. I’ve never been sure whether the USGA banned this method because it was too easy too nontraditional or it just looked bad when viewed from behind. It certainly made putting easier because it gave the golfer the best view of the line before the putt and a clear view of what the ball was doing immediately after it started to roll.

Both of these views provide critically important feedback that golfers generally miss when putting in the conventional style (that is standing to the side of the line). Croquet-style putting has other benefits: It removes all rotational motion of the forearms (which opens and closes the putterface during conventional putting) it forces the wrists to remain solid (no breakdown) and it creates the perfect in-line stroke path straight down the intended putting line.

Lowestoft Rookery Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Lowestoft Rookery Park Golf Club

Wrap your right fingers lightly around the handle of the club Alternative to the interlock grip (The overlap grip)

Lowestoft Rookery Park Golf Club