Low Laithes Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Low Laithes Golf Club

About Low Laithes Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Low Laithes Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Low Laithes Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Low Laithes Golf Club

The first public intimation of a possible golf club at Low Laithes was in the Ossett Observer on 26th July 1924, when it was reported “local golfing circles are interested in rumours of a new golf course at Ossett… Dr Mackenzie of Leeds has been engaged and had suggested an eighteen hole course of some 6,460 yards… in the Flushdyke area”. The area to be used as the golf course was reported to be “undulating without being hilly, it had some excellent natural features and the cost of laying it out would be in the region of £2,000”.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

A few final thoughts. Hard work is never enough. Of course hard work is essential for good putting but it is not sufficient. Only smart hard work on the right things and in the right way will help you reach your putting goals (Figure 15.6.3).

If you will embrace the concepts of putting that I have presented in this book getting your arms around all of them not only will you begin to appreciate the skill involved in putting but you also will start enjoying the fruits of your labor when you work on improving. Always keep the big picture in focus. See the forest and the trees: Play the true break and make those noncompensating pure-in-linesquare (pils) strokes.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

So if you don’t know that downhill putts break more than uphill putts on the same slope (covered in Chapter 7) then you won’t be making many downhill-breaking putts. Or if you believe that Bobby Locke and Ben Crenshaw struck their putts with overspin to make them dive into the hole then it’s unlikely that you’ll work on those aspects of your putting that actually can help you putt better (see section 4.9).

It might seem about now that I’m being very negative about putting that I’m pointing out how hard it is how much you don’t know and how much you have to learn to be a good putter. I’m not trying to he negative but I am trying to point out how much you have to learn. Learning is what good putting is all about: It’s not hard to putt well; it is hard to learn how to putt well. And the difference is crucial. I place much of the blame for the difficulty in learning squarely on the putting green. The green provides a very poor environment in which to learn.

Standing on the putting green golfers have no idea why they miss putts or why they make them. After missing a putt (even on the practice green) most golfers assume their stroke mechanics were to blame. However they may have stroked a perfect putt but it hit a hard-to-see footprint which caused the putt to miss the hole. Or they might make a putt and assume they stroked it perfectly when they actually hit a terrible putt but misread it just the right amount to compensate and – only luck can explain it – roll it into the hole.

I learned a long time ago that if you learn from your mistakes things usually get better. But if you continue to repeat the same mistakes over and over again things get pretty bad. Then I read a book on learning theory and learned that immediate accurate reliable feedback is the key to efficient learning (Figure 2.7.1). This in fact has become the basis of all my teaching (I wrote about it at great length in my Short Game Bible). The basic notion is that if you don’t know right from wrong in practice there is no way you can improve. If you don’t know a good stroke from a bad stroke in practice you are just as likely to groove the bad one as the better one. If you make a perfect putting stroke from a bad setup position and then blame your miss on stroke path you’ll never learn to set up perfectly. Or if you blame your heart your courage or your self-worth when you miss putts then you’ll never fix your aim your path or the impact problems that truly are at fault.

A student in one of our Scoring Game Schools told me a story. In a laboratory devoted to the methodology of learning scientists were studying how pigeons learn to feed themselves from pellet dispensers. In one cage of pigeons they placed a number of dispensers all of which released one pellet every time a pigeon bumped or stepped on the release lever. Every time the lever was hit a pellet fell out. It took just two days for every pigeon in that cage to learn how to feed itself: hit the lever get a pellet.

There was another cage of pigeons which had the same number of identical-looking pellet dispensers. But these dispensers worked differently. They released pellets randomly. Sometimes pellets were released without the levers being touched. Sometimes they were released when the lever was touched once. And sometimes when the lever was touched nothing would happen. In time some of the pigeons thought that when they lifted their right wing a pellet was released. Some of the pigeons thought that if they chirped they would get a pellet. And some of the pigeons believed that if they turned in circles in front of the dispenser they would get a pellet. In two months none of the pigeons learned to feed themselves. In fact it was humorous watching the second cage: every pigeon practicing a different move hoping to release a pellet.

It reminds me of a practice putting green filled with golfers. One golfer is prac ticing a new grip. Another has widened his stance and is bending over more than he used to while his friend is trying the split-hand grip he saw on television. An other golfer is trying to learn a short backswing and “pop” stroke. All these golfers practicing something that they actually did just before they happened to make a putt hoping it will help them make another one.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Low Laithes Golf Club

Now that you have the proper grip with your left hand, we can focus on the right hand. Wrap your right fingers lightly around the handle of the club as shown to the left.

Low Laithes Golf Club