Louth Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Louth Golf Club

About Louth Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Louth Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Louth Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Louth Golf Club

Situated in an area of outstanding natural beauty bordering Hubbard’s Hills, Louth Golf Club offers a challenging 6,430 yard 18 hole parkland course. Complemented by a period clubhouse, putting green and practice areas, Louth Golf Club provides excellent facilities for both members and visiting golfers.

Louth Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

If you haven’t figured out where I’m going with this let me be as blunt as possible: Very few golf balls today are perfectly balanced. Where and how much off-balance a ball is controls in what direction and how far the ball will roll off-line. Sometimes the amount can be significant.

Most Balls Are Pretty Good

This isn’t Consumer Reports and I’m not writing a ball-by-ball evaluation of the golf ball industry. My tests show that most name-brand balls on the market are very nearly in balance. But they’re not perfectly balanced. And when you are as concerned as 1 am about putting then something needs to be done because these balls can affect your putting.

Before going on you should understand that I ‘m not writing this to criticize ball manufacturers. I know how difficult it is to make anything perfect in this world particularly a golf ball. The balls of today are far better than the balls of 10 years ago and the ball manufacturers deserve credit for that. Still most of their balls are not yet perfect.

How can this imbalance affect your putting? Figure 9.8.3 shows the ball track recorded for the “mud-lump” ball stroked by Perfy with a perfect nine-foot stroke. The green had a Stimpmeter rating of 9.5 and the putt was straight as evidenced by the roll of the perfectly balanced ball beside it. This was the worst-case scenario identical strokes by Perfy the off-balance mud-lump ball (left) rolls well off-line compared to the perfectly balanced ball (right).

Wind Lopsided Balls Dimples Rain Sleet and Snow 205 for this mud-lump ball as we positioned it the worst possible way with its off-balance axis positioned exactly horizontal and perpendicular to the direction of roll. You can see how far off-line several more reasonable but still off-balance putts roll (predicted by our theoretical model) in Figure 9.8.4. To compare the off-balance effects of real halls to the theoretical predictions measured and marked a number of new balls bought off the shelf from local golf shops. Most of these balls rolled within a few inches of straight on nine-foot putts even when positioned for maximum off-line roll. Which means you shouldn’t be too upset by our “mud-ball” results. But how often do you miss a nine-foot putt by less than a few inches? It happens. A lot. center it will roll off-line (off-line values greater then 2.13 inches mean the ball would miss the hole on a straight putt and are shown shaded).

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

I mentioned briefly that you can miss the sweetspot both horizontally and vertically. So a word about hitting putts high or low on the face. Most golfers habitually make contact at roughly the same height on their putterface. As long as this height is about four-tenths of an inch above the sole where most putters are designed to be hit this is good.

But some golfers try to hit up on their putts to produce overspin or topspin and in doing so usually contact the ball very low on the putterface near its bottom. This is bad because it causes hand and muscle control of the putter (subjecting you to the effects of adrenaline) and can even result in some putters rotating over the ball if hit hard enough (Figure 4.9.3). Such rotation can actually impart more backspin on a ball than the hitting-up motion removes. (1 prefer backweighted-low putter designs to eliminate this problem.) Hitting up on the ball also raises the effective putter loft which can launch a ball up off the green and produce a bouncing and therefore inconsistent putt.

Having said this there is one situation in which I recommend either hitting up on your putts or using a more-lofted-than-normal putter. When you find yourself putting on soft and severely bumpy greens you might want to try launching your short puns slightly upward to avoid the footprints that would send them squirting left or right. True this is not a great stroke but on truly bad surfaces it may be the least had of your options.

Spinning Puffs

Forget here and now the idea of imparting spin as a way to control your putts. Research has shown that the friction of the green removes all spin from rolling halls

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 93 within about the first 20 percent of their roll. Despite this golfers think that Ben Crenshaw became a good putter by learning to put overspin on his putts and that Bobby Locke put “hook spin” on his putts which made them dive into the hole. Neither of these descriptions is true but amateur golfers believe them because they sound reasonable and give them something new to try in their own putting. (They also give amateurs an excuse for not putting better. Trust me: Most amateurs don’t need any more excuses.)

Still many golfers and even some teaching professionals extol the benefits of “releasing” the putter through impact rotating the face from open to closed to impart hook spin or overspin. Again all reasonably well-stroked putts can be shown to be rolling without any spin whatsoever when they reach the hole. So trying to release the putter makes no sense unless it encourages you to follow through in your stroke and eliminates deceleration and instability. However even in this case releasing the putter will produce more face rotation and give you more inconsistency in directional control due to increased timing problems.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Louth Golf Club

Now, you should be standing up straight, with your chest out, and your shoulders back. Your arms should be out in front of you, your elbows locked, and your wrists level with the height of your waist, while holding the club parallel to the ground. Next, bend over AT THE HIPS until the club touches the ground. Move towards or away from the ball according to where the club touches the ground. After some practice, you will be able to judge the distance well enough so that you don’t have to move around to get into position. Keep your chest out and straight while bending over at the hips. It is impossible to overstate the importance of this. You should not be bending with the back at all to reach down to the ball; you should be bending AT THE HIPS. This is one of the most common mistakes made by amateur golfers. If you look at any professional golfer on television, they will ALWAYS have a straight back, and they will ALWAYS bend at the waist to get to the ball. You will feel like your “seat” is protruding backwards more than usual. That is what we want here. Also, it’s okay if the toe of your club is not flush with the ground. It’s should be that way, especially for the long irons.

Louth Golf Club