Longniddry Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Longniddry Golf Club

About Longniddry Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Longniddry Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Longniddry Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Longniddry Golf Club

Longniddry Golf Course is a unique combination of woodland and links located on the south side of Firth of Forth. There are no (men’s) par 5s although some of the par 4s are very testing, particularly into the prevailing westerly winds; this is reflected by the SSS of 70 – 2 shots above the par of 68. The course is not long by modern standards, but it is designed to reward the strategic player. The fairways are quite generous and the greens are fairly large, but the penalty for straying off-line can be severe. You will find mature Scots Pines, gorse, sea-buckthorn and punitive rough only too eager to punish the wayward drive. Hit it long, certainly, but you’d better be straight!

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

No matter what grip you use it is extremely important that it be installed squarely and correctly not the slightest bit crooked or twisted which would create an incorrect face angle at impact even if your hands were positioned perfectly square to the Aimline. (And if you get used to a crooked grip realize that it’s also almost impossible to replace it in the same crooked position when it wears out.)

There is no one perfect grip for every golfer but for every golfer there is a perfect grip. It may take a little while for you to find yours but it ‘s time well spent.

Head Weight

The head design of the putter you select should he compatible with your ability to align it hit it solidly and have a good feel for distance with it. Heavier putterheads encourage golfers to swing more slowly sometimes leaving putts short; however heavier heads are good if your hands tend to be overactive during the stroke. Lighter putters give golfers with pendulum strokes a better feel for distance because they can make a large swing without rolling the ball too far; but in the hands of a golfer with a handsy stroke a lighter head can be a disaster.

Establish Your Practice Framework 257

If you suffer from the putting yips try a putter with extreme weight in both the head and the shaft. While not a cure it can help smooth out a yippy stroke allowing you to get through impact and keep playing and having fun while working on the problem (discussed in section 14.9).

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Feel is knowing how to do it touch is knowing what to do. A golfer with good touch can have a had day physically when his body simply can ‘t execute what his brain knows he should do. On a day like this we’d say his feel is off. This golfer will be frustrated because he doesn’t seem to be able to do what he knows he can and needs to do. Compare that to a golfer with poor touch: He can have great feel and still never make a putt because if you choose the wrong speed yet roll it perfectly at that speed the results still won ‘t be very good. So poor-touch golfers are more likely to get bewildered than frustrated (Figure 5.2.1).

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 115

5.3 Realities of Touch and Feel

Adrenaline Effects

Since touch and feel both reside in the brain and the brain travels with a golfer’s body it would be logical to assume that both touch and feel would transfer easily from the practice green to the course. Sorry but that is not the case. In fact transferring them to the course is often one of the most difficult aspects of the game for golfers at all skill levels (this is true for the short game as well as putting and as you ‘ll see for the same reason). When a golfer feels excited anxious scared or is under any kind of pressure his heart beats faster and his body produces adrenaline which causes the muscles to get stronger. This can happen on the first tee over a two-foot putt to win the Saturday nassau or on the final hole of the U.S. Open. In all these situations pressure means stronger muscles. And stronger muscles are certain to affect your putting results if it is your muscles that are determining how far and fast your putts roll.

What happens when you practice putting? The heart doesn ‘t beat faster you are not excited and adrenaline isn ‘t produced. No adrenaline because no matter how hard you practice or how much you concentrate on the practice green by it’s very nature practice is repetitive and boring. Deep inside you know that the results don’t matter. You can pretend that this five-footer is to win The Masters but you can ‘t fool your subconscious. If you want to put a little pressure and excitement into your practice sessions either compete with a friend for more money than you can afford to lose or when practicing alone tell yourself (and then live by it) that you can’t quit until you achieve some specific goal such as holing 10 three-footers in a row. We call this “a closer ” and I highly recommend it. (More about it in Chapter 13.)

So if you can’t practice with pressure how do you make practice help your putting on the golf course when it really counts? You could try to avoid pressure on the course but that’s not going to happen. The only way to putt well under pressure is to develop a stroke in practice that works both in practice and on the course when the pressure is on and your muscles are strong. I ‘m not saying you should develop a “pressure stroke ” one that’s different from the stroke you normally practice and use. What I am saying is that you should be smart enough to use your practice time to develop a normal stroke that is the same as your pressure stroke. This is a stroke that doesn’t depend on the strength of your muscles or the speed of your heartbeat. It is a stroke that will work just as well under pressure as in practice. As you’ll see below it’s called a dead-hands stroke.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Longniddry Golf Club

Hold the club steady with your right hand, and place left hand underneath the club as shown. The first joint of the left forefinger should be directly on the bottom of the handle, as well as the last joint of your left pinky. Once you have placed your palm on top of the club, do the same with your left thumb. Place it directly on top of the handle of the club. Next, interlock the left forefinger, and the right pinky. Nudge your right hand all the way towards the bottom of the grip. Now again, wrap the right palm all the way around the top of the grip. Don’t hold the grip of the club in your right palm. You should be able to cover up your left thumb with your right palm if you’ve done it correctly. You’ll see another V-shape being made where your right thumb and right forefinger meet. As a check, this V should be pointing directly at your right shoulder. If it doesn’t point at your right shoulder, rotate your hand on the grip so that it does. Your fingers should be giving the club most of the support it needs, NOT your palms.

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