Longhirst Hall Golf Course

Golf Lessons at Longhirst Hall Golf Course

About Longhirst Hall Golf Course

Golf Lessons at Longhirst Hall Golf Course

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Longhirst Hall Golf Course for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Longhirst Hall Golf Course

The course is sprinkled with lakes. Ducks, geese and swans share the surroundings with the golfers. You can see the grounds of the old hall in the east and there’s Blueberry Wood in the north. In 1997 when The Old Course opened, 42,000 trees were planted. Since then a further 10,000 have been planted , adding to the landscape created in the design of the second course

Longhirst Hall Golf Course

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

The flow-lines of your hips knees and feet are important only inasmuch as they affect the flow lines of the “big three” – your shoulders forearms and eyes. So it is possible to stand with your stance closed or open and still maintain a properly aligned shoulder flow-line (as shown in Figure 11.5.10). However I prefer to see my students set the flow-lines of their lower body square starting with their toes an equal distance from their Aimline. The stance can have great influence on is possible with closed (left) or open (right) stance. However square stances make such alignment easier – and are recommended

Establish Your Practice Framework 239 shoulder alignment so there’s a much greater chance of success keeping their shoulders and forearms in good positions if the lower body also is square to the Aimline.

A final word on flow-lines. Most golfers don’t have much trouble setting them properly parallel to the Aimline on straight putts once they learn how and why to do it. Without this instruction however they aim their flow-lines in many different directions (Figure 11.5.11). This causes great difficulty when it comes to breaking putts where they have no idea of where to align themselves. You can make all alignment simple by always forgetting about everything during setup except the Aimline: Concentrate on first setting up to it then putting along it (Figure 11.5.12). This is just one more reason for going through the steps outlined in previous chapters (and the ones to follow) to help you find the perfect Aimline on every putt.

Stance and Ball Position The perfect putting stance assuming everything else is normal is to set your feet shoulder-width apart. (In section 4.10 I explain that stance width is measured from the center of your feet and the center of your shoulders: Wider than this is okay but sometimes a little uncomfortable; narrower usually is not as stable.)

Once you’re standing properly the ball should be positioned just ahead of the bottom of the stroke arc so it will be launched only slightly upward at impact (Figure 11.5.13). For most golfers this puts perfect ball position about an inch

240 Establish Your Practice Framework and a half (almost the diameter of one ball) behind the instep of the lead foot

Longhirst Hall Golf Course

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Aim Is Learned

Aiming is easy. Everybody aims. It is aiming precisely where you want to aim that is more elusive. The fact that most golfers do a poor job of aiming is not surprising because there’s no feedback on a putting green to teach golfers how to aim properly. In the absence of feedback golfers use two inputs to guide their attempts to aim: First they use their previous putting results (what I call reaction aiming) and second they use the look of their putter relative to their Aimline (what I call position aiming). Further explanations are in order.

Reaction Aiming

The way most golfers aim is to consider past results and then align themselves and their putter to correct for stroke faults and produce the results they want. For example you miss a putt to the left and think “I pulled it ” or maybe “I aimed too far to the left.” Miss several putts left and you think “I must be aiming too far to the left.” So what do you do? You aim to the right. Pretty soon and without realizing you’ve learned to aim consistently to the right as a way of compensating for a stroke that tends to pull to the left.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 65

Data taken in my Scoring Game Schools show conclusively that reaction aiming is a learned skill that most golfers develop as a way to compensate for their putting stroke deficiencies. Players who block their strokes to the right of their Aimline learn to aim to the left of the Aimline. Players who pull their putts to the left learn to aim to the right.

Think about it: Have you ever seen golfers who block putts to the right also aim too far to the right? Of course not. They would miss putts so far to the right it would be ridiculous. They learn to aim to the left and they think this is proper because it produces better results. So the overriding influence on how golfers learn to aim is as a reaction to their results. That is reaction aiming.

Longhirst Hall Golf Course

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Longhirst Hall Golf Course

As you can see in the image to the left, the back remains straight while bending over to the ball. All of the bending is done at the hips. Bending at the waist and keeping a straight back will promote great ball flight and consistency. The relationship between the arms and chest has not changed.

Longhirst Hall Golf Course