London Scottish Golf Club

Golf Lessons at London Scottish Golf Club

About London Scottish Golf Club

Golf Lessons at London Scottish Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit London Scottish Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

London Scottish Golf Club

The London Scottish Golf Club was organised as a club by members of the London Scottish Rifle Volunteers on 5th November 1864 after ashooting match held on the Common by the National Rifle Association.The NRA was inaugurated by Queen Victoria in 1860. The Club was adopted into the London ScottishRifle Volunteers, as shown by a Regimental Order to that effect dated 2nd May 1866. The London Scottish Golf Club’s first headquarters were situated at Mrs Doggett’s cottage under the shadow of the Windmill.

London Scottish Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Both of these views provide critically important feedback that golfers generally miss when putting in the conventional style (that is standing to the side of the line). Croquet-style putting has other benefits: It removes all rotational motion of the forearms (which opens and closes the putterface during conventional putting) it forces the wrists to remain solid (no breakdown) and it creates the perfect in-line stroke path straight down the intended putting line.

Croquet putting is so easy that it was used by no less a legend than Sam Snead in the mid-1960s (when he was in his mid-fifties) to counter a case of the yips. Snead actually putted this way (Figure 3.3.1) – with one foot on either side of the target line – during the 1966 PGA Championship where he finished tied for sixth. Perhaps it was seeing the great Samuel Jackson Snead putt from the wrong direction or perhaps it was deemed to reduce the skill required to play the game – in any case croquet-style putting was quickly outlawed by golf’s powers that be.

So Sam modified the method slightly changing to “sidesaddle” (Figure 3.3.2)

Methods of Putting 39 doing everything as much as he could the same except bringing both feet to the same side of the target line. Snead continued to putt this way until the end of his competitive career and his creation is I believe the next-easiest way to putt.

Just as with croquet-style Sam found that putting sidesaddle allowed him to bend over slightly and look down the line of his putt. But more important it still did away with the breakdown of his wrists. I’m sure golf’s grand pooh-bahs didn’t like what they saw but either they couldn’t figure out a way to outlaw the sidesaddle technique without getting sued or maybe they didn’t have the heart to drive Sam out of the game. Thank heavens they didn’t because it was wonderful watching him play the game even putting from the side for all those years.

Another Variation on a Theme

London Scottish Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

You will see many balls and test results from balls rolled from the True Roller in this book. Remember that the True Roller is simply starting each ball in a given direction at the given speed. And that is what putting is all about.

Look next at the top of Figure 2.6.5 which shows how far the same five balls will roll on an uphill putt (released from the True Roller each with the same energy as before). The uphill putts stop closer together (the distance between the longest and shortest balls is 7.5 feet) indicating that on uphill putts balls tend to roll closer to the same distance. This means the roll of an uphill putt is less sensitive to the length of the stroke than putts on a level surface. The lesson is that even if you don’t hit all of your uphill putts the right speed be sure to get them past the hole.

Problems on the Greens 25

That gives them a chance to go in and the longest ones will probably stop near enough to the hole to leave no-brainers coming back.

Now look at the bottom of Figure 2.6.5 to see how far these same putts roll given the same amount of starting energy on a straight downhill putt. There ‘s a big difference from the level and uphill putts. Of course each downhill putt rolls farther but more important the spread of distances between balls has increased meaning the roll distance is more sensitive to energy input. Now the distance between the longest and shortest balls is 18 feet. So your downhill stroke has to be about three times more precise than your uphill stroke to stop a putt at the right distance. When putting downhill make a stroke of the wrong speed and you’ll have trouble making your next putt.

I’m not saying that understanding putting like this will make you a great putter. But I am saying that understanding nature’s rules and where the dangers lie in putting can help you be a better putter. And not understanding what putting is all about will make it even more difficult for you to learn to putt well.

So if you don’t know that downhill putts break more than uphill putts on the same slope (covered in Chapter 7) then you won’t be making many downhill-breaking putts. Or if you believe that Bobby Locke and Ben Crenshaw struck their putts with overspin to make them dive into the hole then it’s unlikely that you’ll work on those aspects of your putting that actually can help you putt better (see section 4.9).

London Scottish Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition London Scottish Golf Club

Hold the club steady with your right hand, and place left hand underneath the club as shown. The first joint of the left forefinger should be directly on the bottom of the handle, as well as the last joint of your left pinky. Once you have placed your palm on top of the club, do the same with your left thumb. Place it directly on top of the handle of the club. Next, interlock the left forefinger, and the right pinky. Nudge your right hand all the way towards the bottom of the grip. Now again, wrap the right palm all the way around the top of the grip. Don’t hold the grip of the club in your right palm. You should be able to cover up your left thumb with your right palm if you’ve done it correctly. You’ll see another V-shape being made where your right thumb and right forefinger meet. As a check, this V should be pointing directly at your right shoulder. If it doesn’t point at your right shoulder, rotate your hand on the grip so that it does. Your fingers should be giving the club most of the support it needs, NOT your palms.

London Scottish Golf Club