London Beach Hotel And Golf Club

Golf Lessons at London Beach Hotel And Golf Club

About London Beach Hotel And Golf Club

Golf Lessons at London Beach Hotel And Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit London Beach Hotel And Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

London Beach Hotel And Golf Club

The London Beach Golf Course is situated in the beautiful Weald of Kent countryside, close to Tenterden and within easy reach of Ashford and Cranbrook. The Golf course is professionally landscaped and offers a challenging experience.A full-time Professional Golf Coach is available to give private lessons and there are also group classes for beginners and intermediate levels. The Driving range is open all year for you to practice when there is no time for a round of golf.The Golf club is open to the public but there are substantial benefits to membership.Whether you’re a novice or an experienced golfer, London Beach Golf Club has something to offer you…

London Beach Hotel And Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 89

The Quality of Impact

Before we get there however I want you to learn how important your impact point is to your putting. Look at the impact patterns shown on the following two pages (Figure 4.9.2). These patterns are all authentic test results made by golfers on the first day in our Scoring Game Schools. Note they are arranged by handicap with the lowest handicaps at the top left down to the highest handicaps at the bottom right. Also note that the approximate location of the sweetspot of each putter is indicated by the line near the center of each impact tape.

If you study these patterns carefully the results are clear: The lower the handicap the smaller – and closer to the sweetspot – the impact pattern. In other words the better player hits putts closer to the same area of the putterface. And the best players – the Tour pros – have the smallest impact patterns centered on or very near the sweetspot. In fact looking at the consistent correlation between pattern size and handicap on these pages you might think that impact pattern size was the absolute determinant of a player’s ability to score. Of course this is not true but the implications of this data are undeniable.

There’s a very simple message here: The more consistently a player transfers energy to the ball the better his or her putting touch can become. And the better a golfer ‘ s putting touch the more putts he makes and the lower his handicap. Why? Because consistent transfer of energy enhances one’s ability to control the speed that putts roll which controls not only how far and fast the ball travels and how much it breaks but also the probability of its hitting and staying in the hole.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 91

London Beach Hotel And Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Standing behind the ball trying to read the green most golfers decide how much they think the putt is going to break and then where they are going to aim. They select a point or a direction where they intend to start their putt and we refer to the line from the ball to that point or direction as the “Aimline ” or desired initial starting line of the putt (Figure 4.1.3). It’s best called the Aimline because it is the line along which you align your body feet and (it’s hoped) your stroke because you want to start the ball rolling along that line. It ‘s where you’re aiming. If everything was figured properly the ball starts on your Aimline and will roll the proper speed and break (because of the slope of the green) gently into the cup.

The entire path that your putt takes is the “ball track” (left side of Figure 4.1.4). It may remind you of the “action track” sometimes used on television to show how a ball has traveled. The distances between the balls on the track indicate how fast (relatively) the putt is traveling: Farther apart means it is rolling faster; closer together and it is rolling slower. A detailed ball track provides an accurate understanding of a putt’s entire motion – both where and how fast it was going – better even than the same putt recorded and played back on videotape.

The amount or size of the “break” played on a putt is a measure of the difference between the direction you aim and start the putt rolling and where you want it to go. We define the amount of break as the distance between the Aimline (up by the hole) and the nearest edge of the hole measured along a line between the two (right side of Figure 4.1.4). The actual amount the ball breaks (curves) is something different because the ball track ideally curves into the center of the hole. But golfers refuse to deal with that detail. When golfers say they are playing one inch of break what they mean is that their Aimline passes one inch outside the edge of the hole as shown in Figure 4.1.5. Technically they expect the putt to break 3¼ inches – one inch plus half the diameter of the hole (2½ inches) – but they insist on thinking and saying that they are playing one inch of break.

Golfers the world over have made a tacit agreement to think of break as measured from the edge of the hole rather than the center. Unless the putt breaks less than half the width of the hole. Then we refer to it as breaking from somewhere inside the cup such as an “inside left edge” or “right center ” to the center of the hole. Only then do we acknowledge that our target is the center of the hole.

Let’s be sure that you understand the terms I’ve defined so far. You’ve cleaned your ball on the green and replaced it in front of your mark. Standing behind your ball on the ball-hole line you realize that if you putt directly along that line it will break to the left and miss below the hole. So you move slightly downhill from the

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 57 ball-hole line and try to imagine how far uphill to the right you must start your putt if you want to make it. You select an Aimline which runs about 28 inches outside the right edge of the hole you walk to the ball set up perfectly along your new Aimline and make practice strokes until ready. You execute the perfect stroke and your ball starts exactly on your Aimline. You guessed the right amount of break (28 inches) and gave your putt the perfect speed so as it rolls it breaks gently to the left and into the center of the cup. Your ball track formed the perfect arc (Figure 4.1.6) the ball entered the exact center of the hole (centered relative to the ball track) and all is right with the world.

4.2 Stroke Definitions

London Beach Hotel And Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition London Beach Hotel And Golf Club

Notice that the right elbow becomes locked now as the right arm continues to swing. As you can see the right wrist has started to roll on top of the left wrist. The left elbow is now closer to the body, and is able to bend. The left elbow cannot be completely stopped at the imaginary line, but just a hesitation is enough to let your hands swing through the ball. Notice that the triangle is still present.

London Beach Hotel And Golf Club