Lofthouse Hill Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Lofthouse Hill Golf Club

About Lofthouse Hill Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Lofthouse Hill Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Lofthouse Hill Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Lofthouse Hill Golf Club

An undulating 18 hole par 70 parkland course 5988 yards long, conveniently located on the A61 Leeds Road, 10 minutes from Wakefield city centre. View course layout & Scorecard. The course was opened in 1994, over 2500 trees and shrubs were planted during the construction with the back 9 holes which have narrow fairways. The front 9, developed in 2001 are wider and flatter giving two distinct halves providing a challenging and interesting course.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Before going on you should understand that I ‘m not writing this to criticize ball manufacturers. I know how difficult it is to make anything perfect in this world particularly a golf ball. The balls of today are far better than the balls of 10 years ago and the ball manufacturers deserve credit for that. Still most of their balls are not yet perfect.

How can this imbalance affect your putting? Figure 9.8.3 shows the ball track recorded for the “mud-lump” ball stroked by Perfy with a perfect nine-foot stroke. The green had a Stimpmeter rating of 9.5 and the putt was straight as evidenced by the roll of the perfectly balanced ball beside it. This was the worst-case scenario identical strokes by Perfy the off-balance mud-lump ball (left) rolls well off-line compared to the perfectly balanced ball (right).

Wind Lopsided Balls Dimples Rain Sleet and Snow 205 for this mud-lump ball as we positioned it the worst possible way with its off-balance axis positioned exactly horizontal and perpendicular to the direction of roll. You can see how far off-line several more reasonable but still off-balance putts roll (predicted by our theoretical model) in Figure 9.8.4. To compare the off-balance effects of real halls to the theoretical predictions measured and marked a number of new balls bought off the shelf from local golf shops. Most of these balls rolled within a few inches of straight on nine-foot putts even when positioned for maximum off-line roll. Which means you shouldn’t be too upset by our “mud-ball” results. But how often do you miss a nine-foot putt by less than a few inches? It happens. A lot. center it will roll off-line (off-line values greater then 2.13 inches mean the ball would miss the hole on a straight putt and are shown shaded).

9.9 Measure and Mark Your Balance Line

If you’re not a good putter off-balance balls won’t hurt your putting. In fact they might help by rolling some of your off-line putts back to the hole. But if you start your putts rolling on the correct Aimline then off-balance balls can only hurt you. If you’re likely to be adversely affected there is a way to minimize these effects. You have to measure the Balance-line of your balls mark them and set them on the green so the Balance-line will roll along your Aimline (Figure 9.9.1). Aligning the Balance-line with your Aimline not only eliminates the effect of any ball imbalance it also may help you aim your ball and putterface more accurately marked and set on the intended line of roll (Aimline) off-balance roll effects are eliminated. The Balance-line also may help you aim your putter better.

(as detailed in Chapter 11.7). There are two easy ways to measure golf-ball balance: spinning your balls in a Balance-line machine (Figure 9.9.2) or by floating them in a solution of heavy water. The B-line machine is quick and clean; you set the ball in it attach the cover push a switch the ball spins and you mark it.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The skill bases for your touch and feel (green-reading will be discussed in Chapter 7) are intermingled in your mind. They are also intermingled in that they have a combined effect on putting results. But each is a separate skill which can be learned and developed over time.

Touch is in your head but it begins with knowing what your putt looks like and remembering (knowing based on past experience) how much power (the size or intensity of stroke) was required in the past for similar putts. Touch is an acquired skill based on past experiences. It resides in your memory bank and plays a part in creating the mind’s-eye picture of the size of stroke you need.

Before you can develop a good feel for a putt you need to have a good idea for how long it is and how much power will be required to roll it the proper speed and distance: In other words you need to have touch. Given that feel for the putt involves having a good idea of how to apply the power which will be needed to roll the ball at the optimum speed along that line to allow it to break into the hole. Having good feel for a putt is having the idea or picture in your mind’s eye of how the stroke will look and feel in both rhythm and intensity as it rolls the ball to the hole. So a part of feel is in your head. Feel also involves a kinesthetic awareness for the violence (or nonviolence) of your swing and knowing the physical sensation to expect at impact including the vibrations that will travel up the shaft after the putter strikes the ball. It is based on the feel of your collected experience from thousands of swings you’ve made on previous putts and the results they produced. This feel is produced in your nerve endings fingers arms and shoulders in the muscles of all of these entities as well as in your brain and memory.

Is one part of feel more important than any other? I don’t know. But more to the point I’m not sure I care. Because I do know that all these factors are necessary for good putting and the end result feel ultimately is experiential. You’ve got to do it lots of times to learn it and know it.

Feel is knowing how to do it touch is knowing what to do. A golfer with good touch can have a had day physically when his body simply can ‘t execute what his brain knows he should do. On a day like this we’d say his feel is off. This golfer will be frustrated because he doesn’t seem to be able to do what he knows he can and needs to do. Compare that to a golfer with poor touch: He can have great feel and still never make a putt because if you choose the wrong speed yet roll it perfectly at that speed the results still won ‘t be very good. So poor-touch golfers are more likely to get bewildered than frustrated (Figure 5.2.1).

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 115

5.3 Realities of Touch and Feel

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Lofthouse Hill Golf Club

Start your backswing. Focus on keeping your back straight, and your chest out. To help you swing directly around your spine, try focusing on rotating your right shoulder back and around your spine. If you focus on the right shoulder, your left shoulder will be in the correct position automatically. Simple. Keep your left elbow locked.

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