Llanymynech Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Llanymynech Golf Club

About Llanymynech Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Llanymynech Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Llanymynech Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Llanymynech Golf Club

Perched on top of a prominent hill and surrounded by sheer cliff faces, Llanymynech Golf Club offers a unique challenge to all golfers from the aspiring amateur to the seasoned pro. Such an elevated location affords outstanding panoramic views and from the course’s highest point twelve of the old shire counties are visible; ranging from the lowlands of the Shropshire and Cheshire plains to the rugged terrain of the mountains towards Flintshire and Denbighshire. Visitors never fail to marvel at the idyllic scenery and is a source of much conversation in the clubhouse after their round.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

250 Establish Your Practice Framework usually miss toward the heel (between the sweetspot and the shaft axis as recommended above).

Head Balance: Heel-Toe Weighting

There’s good news and bad news regarding the balance of a putterhead. The good news is that the more a putterhead is “heel-toe” balanced – more of its weight is placed toward the ends of the head – the less it twists when mis-hit. (In scientific terms such a putter is said to have a higher moment of inertia.) In general this is good and explains why heel-toe-balanced putters have sold well over the years: Putts hit away from the sweetspot roll a little closer to their intended speed and line. Of course no putter can make putts hit away from the sweetspot roll perfectly but the greater the heel-toe weight distribution the more forgiving the putter is on mis-hits.

Now the bad news. The less a putter twists when mis-hit the better it feels. That sounds good right? Well think about it. Using a putter that feels good even on mis-hits lets golfers get sloppy with their impact patterns which leads to long-term degradation of putting performance. I ‘ve seen many Tour players initially putt well with a heel-toe-balanced putter but then later begin to putt poorly and not know why. They were mis-hitting but didn’t realize it because the putter masked the feel of a mis-hit. When this begins they usually switch to a non-heeltoe-weighted putter until their stroke mechanics and results improve.

If they ask me what to do I offer slightly different advice. I think the advantages of heel-toe-weighted putters are significant and shouldn’t be given up. But I don ‘t want the pros developing a sloppy stroke so I suggest that they continue using a heel-toe-weighted putter on the course and when they practice use a device called the “Teacher Clip ” which trains your stroke to sweetspot contact (Figure 11.6.8). This combination helps keep impact patterns tight (more on this in section 12.3) while still being somewhat forgiving on the course.

Establish Your Practice Framework 251

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 75 lums are illustrated in Figure 4.6.6. Each is swinging from a fixed point with pendulum A swinging vertically below its suspension point describing a back-andforth in-line path along a straight line. Pendulum B is swinging at a 20-degree angle to the vertical supported by a small force shown by arrow B and describing a curved path around the spot directly below its suspension point. Pendulum C is swinging at the opposite 20-degree angle supported by arrow C in a curved motion in the opposite direction around the spot below its suspension point.

All three pendulums are describing pure pendulum motions (the pendulum rhythm will be discussed in section 6.3) which occur in a gravitational field such as that found on Earth. But only pendulum A swings with gravity helping to determine its straight in-line path without any rotation or curvature of the swing path. As you can see both pendulums B and C require outside forces to keep them moving in circular motions.

Now relate these pendulums to putting strokes by attaching putters to the bottom of each pendulum. Pendulum B is what Harvey Penick prescribed: The golfer’s hands hang outside of his shoulder line (the suspension point) at some angle supported by the force B (shown by Justin Leonard in Figure 4.6.7). This puller will describe a curved path around the body like a screen door as long as no hand or arm muscles prevent it from doing so.

In Figure 4.6.8 Fuzzy Zoeller simulates pendulum C by holding his hands inside of his shoulders and at an angle to his suspension point. This putter clearly rotates from outside the Aimline going back to outside the Aimline on the follow-through (the opposite of the screen-door rotation of pendulum B). Again this is a natural pendulum motion but it requires a small force (C) to keep his hands and his I5-degree angle to the vertical below the suspension point.

In these two examples of pendulums B and C it is clear that small side forces are required to make these strokes acceptable for putting and both strokes involve curved paths rotating around the golfer’s body. Now look at pendulum A as a putting stroke which involves no side force or curving path.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 77

The Simplest Pendulum

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Llanymynech Golf Club

Now just line everything up with that item and fire away. This method won’t cure all of your alignment problems, but it does give you a simple way to assure that you are on the right path. Many students have the habit of lining up way left or way right of the target. When the ball goes where they are “aiming”, they think they have a problem. If your ball consistently goes left or right of target, but flies straight, then your problem is your alignment. Try this simple method before every shot on the course and you’ll definitely drop a few strokes.

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