Lilley Brook Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Lilley Brook Golf Club

About Lilley Brook Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Lilley Brook Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Lilley Brook Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Lilley Brook Golf Club

It is my pleasure to welcome you to the Lilley Brook Golf Club website which I hope you will find of great value, whether you are a Member or planning to visit our course in the future. We aim to make visitors very welcome to our Club and in addition to an excellent golf course in beautiful surroundings we can offer comfort to the ‘inner man’ thanks to our excellent Chef and talented kitchen staff. To our Members we expect that the information contained on the website will be valuable in planning the competitions you wish to enter and the results you have achieved.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

320 Develop Your Artistic Senses (Feel Touch Green-Reading) short putt) using your routine and ritual to the beat of the metronome. Immediately look at the second hole make the best preview stroke you can step into your address position execute your ritual and stroke the second ball to the second hole (Figure 13.3.8). Again make this stroke to your body-rhythm cadence.

At first it’s not important that you hole the second putt or even come very close. What you want to do is begin to feel comfortable making a long swing in the same rhythm as your short swing. Only by keeping your rhythm constant for putts of all lengths can you develop optimum feel for speed and distance based on the size of your swings. By putting back and forth you end up feeling and making the perfect stroke for both putts at the same rhythm which is great practice for all of your on-course putting.

Short-Putt Drills

Short putts – of less than about five feet – are the most common shots in golf. Most golfers have a short putt on most holes and almost half of the 43 percent of the game that is putting is short putting. If you can ‘t make your short pulls the game won’t he much fun and you won’t score well.

What do you think causes most short-putt misses? Even though the distance is small many of these putts are missed because they are rolled at a speed that is either too slow or too fast.

Almost every golfer I know could improve simply by remembering this one rule: All putts are speed putts. The title of Chapter 8 is “Speed Is More Important Than Line”: As I explained there if your putts don’t roll at or near the right speed it doesn’t matter where you aim or what your stroke mechanics are like – you won’t make many.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

A common term in sports is “sweetspot.” Tennis players talk about hitting the sweetspot of the racquet; baseball players like to crack the ball on the sweetspot of the bat. Why? Because when contact is made there it feels good and maximum energy is transferred to the ball. The same is true for a putter in golf: The sweet-spot is that place where contact feels the most solid which eliminates all rotation and wobble of the putterhead at impact (Figure 4.9.1) and which transfers the maximum energy possible from the stroke to the ball. If you do everything correctly your impact point will be the sweetspot of your putter.

It is possible to miss the sweetspot either in the vertical plane (hitting the ball too high or too low on the face) or the horizontal plane (making contact toward the toe or the heel of the putter). Any of these misses by as little as a fraction of an inch results in a mis-hit and a loss of energy. But you don’t need to worry because in Chapter 12 I will show you how to measure and mark your putter sweetspot and then learn to hit the ball there repeatedly and consistently.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 89

The Quality of Impact

Before we get there however I want you to learn how important your impact point is to your putting. Look at the impact patterns shown on the following two pages (Figure 4.9.2). These patterns are all authentic test results made by golfers on the first day in our Scoring Game Schools. Note they are arranged by handicap with the lowest handicaps at the top left down to the highest handicaps at the bottom right. Also note that the approximate location of the sweetspot of each putter is indicated by the line near the center of each impact tape.

If you study these patterns carefully the results are clear: The lower the handicap the smaller – and closer to the sweetspot – the impact pattern. In other words the better player hits putts closer to the same area of the putterface. And the best players – the Tour pros – have the smallest impact patterns centered on or very near the sweetspot. In fact looking at the consistent correlation between pattern size and handicap on these pages you might think that impact pattern size was the absolute determinant of a player’s ability to score. Of course this is not true but the implications of this data are undeniable.

There’s a very simple message here: The more consistently a player transfers energy to the ball the better his or her putting touch can become. And the better a golfer ‘ s putting touch the more putts he makes and the lower his handicap. Why? Because consistent transfer of energy enhances one’s ability to control the speed that putts roll which controls not only how far and fast the ball travels and how much it breaks but also the probability of its hitting and staying in the hole.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Lilley Brook Golf Club

Wrap your right fingers lightly around the handle of the club Alternative to the interlock grip (The overlap grip)

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