Leighton Buzzard Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Leighton Buzzard Golf Club

About Leighton Buzzard Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Leighton Buzzard Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

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Leighton Buzzard Golf Club

NESTLING in the folds of the Bedfordshire-Buckinghamshire border, Leighton Buzzard Golf Club has a history dating back to 1925 and is acclaimed as o­ne of the prettiest and most challenging courses in the region.Carved out of woodland and sandy grazing land, at 6,100 yards, the Leighton course may not be the longest in the county but demands the highest standards of accuracy and is aptly described as “a thinking man’s golf course.”From the opening drive o­n the 422-yard Par 4 first to the final tee and a blind 367 yard return to the spacious new club house, the Leighton course presents a rich variety of challenges, nine holes described by golfing legend Henry Longhurst as “the second best nine holes in the country”, and three of the toughest finishing holes most golfers will ever experience.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Face Your Special Problems 349 the face the ball will roll like a putt at about the speed you expect. This shot works because the wedge doesn’t have to go through the grass before hitting the hall while a putter (Figure 14.3.2) must travel down through grass trapping blades of grass between ball and face where grass cushioning can seriously affect the roll.

If your ball is sitting down in tall grass even if it’s close to the edge of the green the putter is the last club you want to use. Among the clubs that will work better are a 5-wood (small head rounded bottom good loft) a 3- or 5-iron even a wedge played well back in your stance. All these shots are shown in my Short Game Bible and all will work better from deep grass than putting.

Finally an important point to remember. For most golfers how you swing is more important than what you swing on shots like these. When Phil Mickelson and Payne Stewart played their off-the-green shots in the 1999 U.S. Open at Pinehurst No. 2 with ” back-in-their-stance” wedges – while most of the field played these same shots with 3-woods and putters – the differences were in the players not the clubs. You could have given Payne and Phil woods and putters and they still would have

350 Face Your Special Problems been playing in the last group on Sunday because they had become really good at these shots. They have practiced them over the years with many different clubs and they knew how to hit these shots. You must practice these shots with your putter (or whatever club) to find out when it will and when it won’t work for you. Simply choosing the right club won’t solve this problem if you don’t know how to hit it.

14.4 Putting on Slopes

Do you have difficulty stopping your uphill or downhill putts near the cup? Many golfers do and I think one reason is that how long a putt looks can be very deceiving on sloped surfaces. Just as 1 showed in Chapter 4 that a putterface swinging pure-in-line and square along the Aimline can appear to be rotating depending on where your eyes (or a camera lens) are located it is also true that the length of a sloping putt can appear to be different when viewed from different positions.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Proper speed also largely eliminates the chance of three-putting. Above all else good speed control is a requirement for good putting.

The Sweetspot in Two Dimensions

I mentioned briefly that you can miss the sweetspot both horizontally and vertically. So a word about hitting putts high or low on the face. Most golfers habitually make contact at roughly the same height on their putterface. As long as this height is about four-tenths of an inch above the sole where most putters are designed to be hit this is good.

But some golfers try to hit up on their putts to produce overspin or topspin and in doing so usually contact the ball very low on the putterface near its bottom. This is bad because it causes hand and muscle control of the putter (subjecting you to the effects of adrenaline) and can even result in some putters rotating over the ball if hit hard enough (Figure 4.9.3). Such rotation can actually impart more backspin on a ball than the hitting-up motion removes. (1 prefer backweighted-low putter designs to eliminate this problem.) Hitting up on the ball also raises the effective putter loft which can launch a ball up off the green and produce a bouncing and therefore inconsistent putt.

Having said this there is one situation in which I recommend either hitting up on your putts or using a more-lofted-than-normal putter. When you find yourself putting on soft and severely bumpy greens you might want to try launching your short puns slightly upward to avoid the footprints that would send them squirting left or right. True this is not a great stroke but on truly bad surfaces it may be the least had of your options.

Spinning Puffs

Forget here and now the idea of imparting spin as a way to control your putts. Research has shown that the friction of the green removes all spin from rolling halls

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Leighton Buzzard Golf Club

At the end of step two, you reached the top of your backswing. As soon, as you get there, start your downswing. As you start the downswing, make sure to remind yourself to keep your arms “connected” to your chest and shoulders. Stay connected all the way through the ball. Your hands and arms only swing as the shoulders rotate. If you start your downswing by rotating your chest, without starting to swing your arms, you will most definitely end up slicing the ball. If you swing your arms before rotating your chest, you will most likely hook the ball. Staying connected will always produce the straightest ball.

Leighton Buzzard Golf Club