Lee On The Solent Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Lee On The Solent Golf Club

About Lee On The Solent Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Lee On The Solent Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Lee On The Solent Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Lee On The Solent Golf Club

The course is 102 years old and remains a challenging test of golf for all standards of golfer. Congratulations to the Ladies Section who are celebrating their Centenary anniversary this year and I wish them every success.A professional programme of woodland management has been undertaken over the last two years to protect the long term sustainability of the course by improving light and air to all areas. The beneficial improvements are already contributing significantly to the high quality course presentation. Over the coming years further bunkering and tee improvements are being planned to reflect the developments in club and ball technology with golfers now hitting the ball further and at times straighter!! The original character of the course will be maintained.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Establish Your Practice Framework 251

As much as I like heel-toe weighting I won’t use a putter no matter how forgiving if it means sacrificing easy and accurate alignment (more about alignment in section 11.7). In the long run good putting means consistently striking putts on the sweetspot. Do that and you won’t have any problems with head balance or putter twisting. And that’s why you see as many Tour pros putting with non-heeltoe-balanced putters as putting with strongly heel-toe-balanced putters. Hit putts on the sweetspot and there is no difference.

Golfers’ Grips

However you choose to hold on to the putter your grip should present the putter-face to the ball in a square position through impact keep your forearm flow-lines in good position and allow you to feel the flow of your stroke.

There’s no doubt that the grip is important. But there is no one grip that is best for all golfers. The most common is the “parallel-palm” grip (Figure 11.6.9): Holding the grip along the lifeline of your left hand instead of in the fingers (as in the power grip used on full-swing shots) helps the putter function as part of your arm and decreases the tendency to supply power with your hands (Figure 11.6.10). Keeping the palms parallel to the face of the putter also makes it easy to keep your forearm flow-line in good position (parallel to your Aimline).

Something else which very few people talk about is spreading the hands apart on the grip. The farther apart they are the less active the wrist muscles in the stroke which explains some of the success of the long puller. But spreading the hands also makes it difficult to coordinate the actions of the arms so it is impractical on a standard-length putter (although you might try moving your hands apart a little bit just to see what happens). Unfortunately once you find a good

Lee On The Solent Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The amount or size of the “break” played on a putt is a measure of the difference between the direction you aim and start the putt rolling and where you want it to go. We define the amount of break as the distance between the Aimline (up by the hole) and the nearest edge of the hole measured along a line between the two (right side of Figure 4.1.4). The actual amount the ball breaks (curves) is something different because the ball track ideally curves into the center of the hole. But golfers refuse to deal with that detail. When golfers say they are playing one inch of break what they mean is that their Aimline passes one inch outside the edge of the hole as shown in Figure 4.1.5. Technically they expect the putt to break 3¼ inches – one inch plus half the diameter of the hole (2½ inches) – but they insist on thinking and saying that they are playing one inch of break.

Golfers the world over have made a tacit agreement to think of break as measured from the edge of the hole rather than the center. Unless the putt breaks less than half the width of the hole. Then we refer to it as breaking from somewhere inside the cup such as an “inside left edge” or “right center ” to the center of the hole. Only then do we acknowledge that our target is the center of the hole.

Let’s be sure that you understand the terms I’ve defined so far. You’ve cleaned your ball on the green and replaced it in front of your mark. Standing behind your ball on the ball-hole line you realize that if you putt directly along that line it will break to the left and miss below the hole. So you move slightly downhill from the

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 57 ball-hole line and try to imagine how far uphill to the right you must start your putt if you want to make it. You select an Aimline which runs about 28 inches outside the right edge of the hole you walk to the ball set up perfectly along your new Aimline and make practice strokes until ready. You execute the perfect stroke and your ball starts exactly on your Aimline. You guessed the right amount of break (28 inches) and gave your putt the perfect speed so as it rolls it breaks gently to the left and into the center of the cup. Your ball track formed the perfect arc (Figure 4.1.6) the ball entered the exact center of the hole (centered relative to the ball track) and all is right with the world.

4.2 Stroke Definitions

Where are you aiming? Sooner or later 1 ask that question of every golfer I work with. Aim is a critical aspect of putting (more on that later) and both you and I need to know not only where you are trying to aim (where you think you are aiming) but also where you are actually aiming your putter your stance and your stroke.

Technically when I refer to aim I am referring to a direction. The direction of your aim can be at a place like the edge of the hole or at an object such as a discolored piece of grass a spike mark or anything you can see and define. What you choose to aim at can be anywhere along your Aimline from just in front of the ball to alongside or even past the hole. Your aim can be one inch one ball three balls a foot or even 10 feet outside the right or left edge of the cup or it can be anywhere inside the cup. Only after you determine how much you expect your putt to break and define somewhere or something to aim at can the direction of your aim your Aimline be visualized located or marked on the green.

Lee On The Solent Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Lee On The Solent Golf Club

Focus on using your spine as your axis now. Turn both shoulders and sides directly around your spine. Keep your left arm locked, and your left wrist locked. Although difficult to see from this camera-angle, the triangle is still perfectly in tact.

Lee On The Solent Golf Club