Lamerwood Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Lamerwood Golf Club

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Golf Lessons at Lamerwood Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Lamerwood Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Lamerwood Golf Club

Designed by Cameron Sinclair, the Scottish golf course architect, the course is set on 240 acres of mature wood and parkland. Fairways have been cut through wood land to give the course an established feel. At 6,953 yards this par 72 course provides experienced golfers with a challenge whilst not frustrating beginners.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

You also can help your putting by becoming aware of the most likely mistakes golfers make and avoiding them when you encounter various situations. For example when putting uphill the most common error is leaving it short. By being aware of this you can make sure your preview stroke will get your putt to the hole. Also realizing that you’re unlikely to roll a putt significantly past the hole on uphill putts can be comforting.

You already know how much more sensitive downhill putts are than uphill putts regarding distance control (see section 2.6). Also realizing that most downhill errors come from rolling too far past the hole will let you focus your preview stroke on floating the ball in softly from above the cup.

Downhill putts become extra troublesome if they are also sidehill. This is what we call the downhill slider the most dangerous putt in golf. The trouble comes because most golfers underread the break which forces their subconscious to try to keep the putt from breaking its normal amount which it does by rolling the ball faster. As a result it rolls way past the hole into three-putt-land. Again being aware of this common mistake lets you be extra careful and try to float the ball in gently from the high side. if you play on courses with fast sloping greens that give you trouble (like too many three-putts) go practice some lag drills on those slopes. Rather than complaining about your putting and blaming it on some natural talent deficiency you

352 Face Your Special Problems claim to have practice to remove the problems. 1 can assure you that Tour pros spend extra practice time on their lag-putting drills when they get to courses with fast sloping greens.

14.5 Killer Downhillers

Do you have trouble with severe downhill putts? Do you feel that no matter what you do the ball is going to roll past the cup possibly way past? I know two ways to take speed out of putts particularly on really fast downhillers.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

But if you want to learn more about controlling your putting speed and making more putts you need to know more about speed than that. In fact you need to know how the rolling speed of your putts compares to their perfect or optimum speed around the hole. The speed of a putt depends on its length how fast it started where it is along its ball track how fast the green surface is and the slope (up down or sidehill) it is rolling on. For every putt there is an optimum speed that will optimize the percentage of putts that would both hit and stay in the hole. Therefore in this book as in my Scoring Game Schools we refer to a putt’s speed (while imagining its ball track) as how it relates to the optimum speed it should or could be rolling. For example as you can see in Figure 4.3.1 the left putt’s speed was too much as compared to the right putt’s speed which was virtually perfect. A detailed discussion of putting speed and optimum-speed ball tracks is in Chapter 7.

Green Speed

The speed of the surface of the green or green speed affects a ball’s roll in speed direction and amount of break. I ‘m sure you have heard greens referred to as “fast ” “slow ” “quick ” “slick ” or “sticky.” Technically the speed of the green is determined by the frictional characteristics of the surface of the green which is controlled primarily by the length type density and moisture content of the grass (more on this in Chapter 7). Golf course superintendents traditionally measure the speed characteristics of greens using a device called the Stimpmeter. much speed (left) and perfect speed (right) for two putts rolled on the same starting line.

The Stimpmeter developed years ago by a man named Edward Stimpson is a crude yet simple way to measure how far a ball will roll on a flat portion of a green when it is given a standard starting speed. The USGA-approved version of a

Stimpmeter is a solid straight piece of aluminum extruded at a 30-degree angle with an indentation near the top and a beveled bottom (Figure 4.3.2). The beveled bottom allows the Stimpmeter to sit low to the green surface and reduce the bounce of a ball rolling down the channel when it hits the green.

The Stimpmeter was designed to release balls onto a green surface with constant initial speed (energy).

Measuring Green Speed To use a Stimpmeter a ball is placed in the indentation and the device is raised slowly until the ball rolls free and down the groove onto the green (Figure 4.3.3). Care must he taken to hold the Stimpmeter still as the ball rolls down the ramp to ensure constant release energy and ball speed at the bottom of the ramp.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Lamerwood Golf Club

The right elbow should remain locked to your right side throughout the backswing. As you can see, the left arm is still locked as well.This step is included for many reasons. First, it helps you swing around your spine and promotes a correct shoulder turn. It’s really hard to move your body horizontally, while keeping your right elbow locked to your side at the same time. Secondly, it prevents the “flying elbow.” The flying elbow produces everything from a slice to a wicked hook, depending on what you do with your hands in conjunction with it. So, keeping your elbow in contact with your side will help tremendously in assuring that you swing around your body, every single time. Third, it’s a power-producing move because it will put you in a position to easily flip your hands through the ball. Fourth, keeping your right elbow locked to your side will give you a great point of reference. It keeps your swing plane correct, and is a great indicator of when to stop the back swing. Finally, it helps you to “stay connected” throughout the swing. If you have your right elbow locked at your side, it will be hard to swing your arms without rotating your shoulders and visa versa.

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