La Moye Golf Club

Golf Lessons at La Moye Golf Club

About La Moye Golf Club

Golf Lessons at La Moye Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit La Moye Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

La Moye Golf Club

This 18 hole links type course of approx 6664 yards from the medal tees presents a fair challenge for golfers of all handicaps featuring large sand hills, pot bunkers, gorse bushes and punishing rough. A stiff wind will invariably add to the task.Located in St Brelade in the south west of the Island, the golfer is presented with stunning views inland of the western parishes and seaward of St Ouen’s Bay and the sister Channel Islands of Guernsey, Sark, Herm and Jethou.

La Moye Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

174 Green-Reading the 15th Building Block vertically (Figure 7.11.4 shows how several popular putter models hang at angles to a true plumb line).

What Are They Looking At? So what are golfers who plumb-bob doing? What are they looking at? Do these golfers – and I’m talking about some very good players (Figure 7.11.5) – have any idea what they’re doing?

After questioning several hundred plumb-bobbing golfers and measuring how they read break I’ve determined that they all violate the third rule of plumb-bobbing listed above. They don’t really stand behind the ball exactly on the ball-hole line. They say they do but if you measure where they stand they really don’t. Rather they instinctively stand below (on the low side of) that line. Then when they hold the putter over the ball in front of one eye (and that eye is now on the low side of the ball-hole line) the top of the shaft appears to be on the high side of the hole (giving them the view shown previously in Figure 7.11.2 B and D) confirming a break from the high side down the slope.

All this means is that the subconscious knew where to stand and which way the ball would break before the golfer ever lifted the putter to eye level. So in truth golfers who plumb-bob to read their putts stand (position themselves) so they see what they already (at least subconsciously) know.

Green-Reading the 15th Building Block 175

I’ll say it again: The plumb-bob doesn ‘ t work in putting.

La Moye Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

For most golfers to improve their scores it is often easier to reduce their number of three-putts than it is to increase their number of one-putts. This is generally true for golfers with handicaps greater than 20 although it is even true for some very fine lower-handicap players. As you can see in Figure 2.9.1 the length of the most frequent first putt on greens hit from outside 60 yards is 38 feet. (This distance varies a little with the handicap of the players measured but obviously there are many more long first putts than short ones.) This figure also shows that the most frequent first putt to follow shots hit from inside 60 yards is an 18-footer. If you combine these two curves and add in all the second and third putts that become necessary after the first putt is missed you can see a typical value for the number of putts of each length golfers face per round over a season of golf (Figure 2.9.2).

Now look at the conversion curve for this group of 15- to 25-handicap golfers (Figure 2.9.3) and the frequency with which they three-putt versus the putt distance (Figure 2.9.4). By comparing these data you can see the importance of making short putts as well as learning that you can save several strokes per round by eliminating three-putts from outside 30 feet. This means that you shouldn’t practice only short putts; the long ones are also important. And you must stop three-putting those long ones if you want to be a good putter.

For those not familiar with “lag putting ” some explanations:

• To lag a putt is to minimize thoughts of holing it instead concentrating on stopping the ball as close to the proper distance and as close to the hole as possible thus minimizing the possibility of three-putting (which is first priority).

Problems on the Greens 31

Lag putters (golfers who always seem to be lagging their putts) usually leave more than half of their putts short which is not good when you are trying to hole the maximum percentage of makable putts (those inside 30 feet). But to be a good lag putter from outside 35 feet is one of putting’s

Practice Tips more important skills.

La Moye Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition La Moye Golf Club

Really flip your right wrist through the ball. This action will give you a lot more club head speed. It also eliminates any slice that you may have had because your left elbow isn’t flying on the follow through anymore. So, essentially you’re keeping the left elbow close to the body now. Before it was your right, and now it’s your left elbow that you are keeping tight to your body. Keep your left elbow close to your body, and flip the right wrist through the ball at the same time. You should feel the extra power this gives you.

La Moye Golf Club