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Golf Lessons at Kirtlington Golf Club

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Golf Lessons at Kirtlington Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Kirtlington Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Kirtlington Golf Club

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

8.2 Line Is Instinctive

This is another one of those times when I sympathize with golfers because their instinct – to work on line rather than speed – seems to make sense. Why? Because it is easier to see errors in line than errors in speed. Figure 8.2.1 shows three ball tracks for a straight putt rolled at the same speed but started on different Aimlines. Most golfers with any experience would probably correctly diagnose these three putts as a push one struck perfectly and a pull. It’s instinct because it’s easy to see: Ball goes right of the target it’s a push; ball goes in it’s perfect; ball goes left it ‘s a pull.

While realizing that you pulled or pushed your putt off your intended line is an instinctive and natural reaction golfers take it too far. They get overconcerned and overfocused on the direction thereby becoming what we call “line-locked” over their putts. They get so concerned about line that they forget how fast or how far the putt needs to roll. As often as not they leave putts short of the hole rolling them on-line but at the wrong speed.

Getting”line-locked” is a serious problem. And the best way I know to correct it is to prove to you that there are always several Aimlines your ball can follow and still find the hole. Why is this true? Because the hole is 4.25 inches wide the ball is only 1.68 inches in diameter (Figure 8.2.2) and different putt speeds will always give you a choice of ball tracks (unless it is one of those few dead-straight putts in

Speed Is More Important Than Line 183 which case it will roll straight at any speed). Because the ball is much less than half the size of the hole even straight putts offer a choice of makable Aimlines since you can aim a little to the left a little to the right or dead in the middle and still find the hole (Figure 8.2.3).

There are even more Aimline choices on breaking putts than on straight putts. As explained in Chapter 7 starting on any Aimline the faster you roll your putt the less it will break; and the slower you roll a putt the more it will break. So you can choose a very high line and roll the ball so slowly that it breaks madly down the slope and just dribbles over the top edge of the cup. Or you can play a low closer-to-straight Aimline and drill your putt into the cup hoping to catch the back edge squarely to avoid the chance of a lip-out (Figure 8.2.4). And then there are countless combinations of Aimlines and speeds in between: a little higher with a little slower roll; a little lower with a little more speed. The choices are almost endless even on a relatively short putt.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

4.2 Stroke Definitions

Where are you aiming? Sooner or later 1 ask that question of every golfer I work with. Aim is a critical aspect of putting (more on that later) and both you and I need to know not only where you are trying to aim (where you think you are aiming) but also where you are actually aiming your putter your stance and your stroke.

Technically when I refer to aim I am referring to a direction. The direction of your aim can be at a place like the edge of the hole or at an object such as a discolored piece of grass a spike mark or anything you can see and define. What you choose to aim at can be anywhere along your Aimline from just in front of the ball to alongside or even past the hole. Your aim can be one inch one ball three balls a foot or even 10 feet outside the right or left edge of the cup or it can be anywhere inside the cup. Only after you determine how much you expect your putt to break and define somewhere or something to aim at can the direction of your aim your Aimline be visualized located or marked on the green.

The track along which your putter travels is your “putter path. ” It can move straight back and straight through in-line with your Aimline it can cut across from outside-to-in or inside-to-out (shown in Figure 4.2.1) or it can loop around your Aimline. Golfers take their putters severely or slightly inside and outside their Aimlines waver along their Aimlines and sometimes incorporate a bit of all of the above into their putting paths. I believe there are almost as many distinct putter paths as there are golfers and I’m sure I haven’t seen them all.

Face Angle

A very important consideration is the putterface angle which we define as the angle between the perpendicular to your putterface and your Aimline (left side

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 59

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Kirtlington Golf Club

First of all, it’s important that you realize that your grip will affect the results that you get. However, it’s not as complicated as the other systems make it out to be. First, grab the club with your right hand so the face of it is toward the target. Keep the face pointed toward the target, while placing your left hand on the bottom of the grip or handle. At this point you should be holding your left hand out flat, so that it is touching the bottom of the grip. Position the joint where your left pinky meets your palm directly underneath the handle of the club. Keep the pinky there and place the first joint in your left forefinger directly underneath the club. Now, do not lift your fingers up, bringing the grip of the club into your palm; instead, hold the handle steady with your left fingers and wrap your palm around the top of the grip. This is an important distinction. Again, don’t wrap the fingers towards the palm, but instead wrap your palm around the top of the club. Now, you should be able to easily place your left thumb directly on top of the club. This should form a V-shape where your left thumb and left forefinger meet. This V-shape should point directly to your right shoulder when it’s complete.

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