Kirkbymoorside Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Kirkbymoorside Golf Club

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Golf Lessons at Kirkbymoorside Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Kirkbymoorside Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Kirkbymoorside Golf Club

BREAKFAST SPECIAL Full English breakfast 18 holes of golf Soup or chips & sandwiches £22 WINTER SPECIAL Coffee/tea & bacon roll 18 holes of golf Soup or chips & sandwiches £19 Parties of four or more.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

“target line.” But many golfers use “target line” to describe the line between their ball and the point at which they are aiming the line on which they hope to start the putt rolling. But you seldom try both to aim and start your ball rolling along a straight line at the hole and expect it to keep rolling on that line because most putts break at least a little bit.

Therefore it is clearer to refer to this direction as your hall-hole line. Also realize that the ball-hole line extends forever in both directions (as shown) and that it is the ball-hole line that most golfers walk to and stand on behind their ball as they first try to read the break of their putts.

Standing behind the ball trying to read the green most golfers decide how much they think the putt is going to break and then where they are going to aim. They select a point or a direction where they intend to start their putt and we refer to the line from the ball to that point or direction as the “Aimline ” or desired initial starting line of the putt (Figure 4.1.3). It’s best called the Aimline because it is the line along which you align your body feet and (it’s hoped) your stroke because you want to start the ball rolling along that line. It ‘s where you’re aiming. If everything was figured properly the ball starts on your Aimline and will roll the proper speed and break (because of the slope of the green) gently into the cup.

The entire path that your putt takes is the “ball track” (left side of Figure 4.1.4). It may remind you of the “action track” sometimes used on television to show how a ball has traveled. The distances between the balls on the track indicate how fast (relatively) the putt is traveling: Farther apart means it is rolling faster; closer together and it is rolling slower. A detailed ball track provides an accurate understanding of a putt’s entire motion – both where and how fast it was going – better even than the same putt recorded and played back on videotape.

The amount or size of the “break” played on a putt is a measure of the difference between the direction you aim and start the putt rolling and where you want it to go. We define the amount of break as the distance between the Aimline (up by the hole) and the nearest edge of the hole measured along a line between the two (right side of Figure 4.1.4). The actual amount the ball breaks (curves) is something different because the ball track ideally curves into the center of the hole. But golfers refuse to deal with that detail. When golfers say they are playing one inch of break what they mean is that their Aimline passes one inch outside the edge of the hole as shown in Figure 4.1.5. Technically they expect the putt to break 3¼ inches – one inch plus half the diameter of the hole (2½ inches) – but they insist on thinking and saying that they are playing one inch of break.

Golfers the world over have made a tacit agreement to think of break as measured from the edge of the hole rather than the center. Unless the putt breaks less than half the width of the hole. Then we refer to it as breaking from somewhere inside the cup such as an “inside left edge” or “right center ” to the center of the hole. Only then do we acknowledge that our target is the center of the hole.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 85 his perfect in-line-square stroke (Figure 4.7.9). The problem is obvious: If you don’t align your shoulders parallel to the desired starting line for the putt even the perfect stroke path and a square putter blade won’t start the ball rolling on the right line.

So if you are going to take my advice and develop an in-line-square stroke you must be absolutely sure that as you learn this stroke you also learn to address the ball with your shoulders square (parallel-left) to your putting line. And as you will learn in Chapter 11 setting up parallel-left has other benefits as well.

4.8 The Importance of Putterface Angle

While putter path has relatively minor influence on the starting line direction of your putts (only about 17 percent) the putterface angle at the moment of impact (Figure 4.8.1) has a tremendous effect the remaining 83 percent (assuming contact is made on the sweetspot). This means face angle is more than four times as important as putter path. You may find this imbalance in importance surprising (most golfers do) but it’s true.

If you are having a hard time believing this run the following test for yourself. As shown in Figure 4.8.2 aim the edge of a heavy piece of wood to the left edge of a target. Place a ball just outside the wood about the distance from the heel of the

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 87 putter to the sweetspot and hold the putterface open to a 45-degree angle to the target with a piece of cardboard (cut the cardboard with equal-length sides A and B at right angles then cut side C between the end points as shown in the inset). Using both hands to hold the face open at that angle and keeping the heel against the wood slide the putter toward the target to simulate a putting stroke (shown from right to left in figure). If you keep the face 45 degrees open the ball will start to the right almost perpendicular to the open face (actually 45 degrees times .83 = 37 degrees) no matter how hard you hit it.

This should convince you that even with the perfect path poor face angle at the moment of impact will start your putts off-line big-time.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Kirkbymoorside Golf Club

Now just line everything up with that item and fire away. This method won’t cure all of your alignment problems, but it does give you a simple way to assure that you are on the right path. Many students have the habit of lining up way left or way right of the target. When the ball goes where they are “aiming”, they think they have a problem. If your ball consistently goes left or right of target, but flies straight, then your problem is your alignment. Try this simple method before every shot on the course and you’ll definitely drop a few strokes.

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