Kintore Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Kintore Golf Club

About Kintore Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Kintore Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Kintore Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Kintore Golf Club

Kintore Golf Club, situated in the Royal Burgh of Kintore, was formed in 1911, since which time the total membership has grown to around 700. In the early 1990’s the course was extended to 18 holes and now covers a large area of ground from the Don basin, overlooked by the clubhouse, to mature woodland at the far perimeter, giving an interesting contrast between the ‘old and new nines’. Excellent drainage results in very few days of lost play throughout the year.

Kintore Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Problems on the Greens 19

Years ago as I began pondering the inconsistencies and uncertainties in putting performance I became fascinated by the possibility of learning enough about putting to help golfers learn to do it better. I had a breakthrough – a moment when I knew I’d truly be able to help people – when I started studying the footprints golfers left on greens. As I watched a ball I’d filmed in slow motion roll innumerable directions on a single putt it seemed as though an army had marched across the green on the line of the putt. I examined that area of the green at sunset. I sat in amazement watching the shadows lengthen wondering how anyone could hole any putt over such an uneven surface. There seemed to be thousands of footprint lines humps humps and heel-print edges in the grass any one of which was capable of turning a slowly rolling ball in a different direction. I realized that even a perfectly stroked putt rolling over that green would have a very good chance of being diverted from the hole. I also realized that an imperfectly stroked putt rolling over that same green would have a chance of being knocked into the hole.

That was one of what I consider the critical “learning moments” I’ve had in golf. Looking closely at that green from ground level I decided to measure the severity of this effect on the entire course. I got up early the next morning and followed the first group while the greens were still covered with dew. This allowed me to actually see and count the individual footprints. I learned that a foursome often makes more than 500 footprints on each green it plays. Even worse these footprints were not evenly distributed: Most were within six feet of the hole because half of all putts were from less than six feet away. They created a trampled-down area between 6 feet and 6 inches away from the hole (no one was so inconsiderate as to step within 6 inches of the cup) and 360 degrees around it. I began referring to this area as the “lumpy donut” (see Figure 2.4.1).

There’s no way a golfer can know how many footprints are between his ball and the hole before a putt. That’s true even if you are in the first group to tee off when the greens are in the best possible condition to allow putts to roll straight and true. Because even then one of the men who cut the grass on the green or cut the cup into the green earlier that morning may have left one footprint dead in the path of your putt as it slows near the hole. And if this one footprint turns your putt away from the hole you’re going to get disgusted and assume it just isn’t your day (or worse think you made a had stroke). If however this footprint turns your ball into the hole you do a little dance (making more footprints!) and assume you hit a great putt. Again this is one more example of the unpredictable and statistical nature of putting. You can’t do much about it but you should be aware of it because you’ll never detect or be absolutely sure about these invisible land mines that lie in wait on the greens.

The Ramp

There was something else I noticed while collecting my lumpy-donut data. On greens where the traffic was particularly intense there was a ramp – a raised area – all around and leading up to the hole. The golfers had trampled near the cup but they were very careful not to step inside the six inches immediately around it so that area was elevated inside the center of the lumpy donut (Figure 2.4.2). These ramps I learned cause many putts that are slowing down and dying as they near the hole to be stopped short or turned away. I measured and found that if those same slow-rolling putts were hit at the same speed on a perfect surface they should have and would have fallen into the hole. So because numerous golfers before you were respectful of the hole your putt missed.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

One of the tenets of the USGA the ruling body of golf is to protect and maintain the integrity of the game in part by preserving its challenge and difficulty. I support this noble purpose and think most golfers feel the same way. If we lost the challenge in the game it wouldn’t be nearly so much fun. Having said that we all want to make our own putting strokes simpler so we can hole more putts score better and enjoy the game to its fullest.

In keeping with their tradition of maintaining the game’s challenge the USGA would prefer that golfers putt in what they describe as the “traditional style.” While this technique is not as simple or easy as the methods described above it’s not necessarily all that difficult either. Lots of putts have been and will be made the USGA way.

Up to this point I have been going from the easiest to more difficult ways to putt. Now I have to reverse that. In discussing the following ways to putt all of which conform to the Rules I will begin with the most difficult and work down to what I perceive to be the easiest way to putt.

The USGA would be happiest if every golfer would putt like Bobby Jones (Figure 3.4.1) used to putt and would use a putter similar to Jones’s old “Calamity Jane.” Jones putted standing perpendicular to the intended putting line and made what appeared to be a miniature golf swing. While this sounds like it might make putting easy being like all the other swings in golf in reality it makes putting quite a bit more difficult.

If the putting stroke is a miniature chip shot which is a miniature 5-iron swing which is a miniature driver swing it makes down-the-line vision difficult involves a slight rotation of the body and encourages rotation of the forearms. This also encourages rotation of the putterface provides far more power than is needed and brings to bear critical timing requirements all of which make putting so difficult and traumatic to so many golfers.

Methods of Putting 41

As I continue to detail the various options you have for putting you should know that some of the legal ways are easier than others (yet not one is truly easy). And here’s the kicker: Only one will work best for you.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Kintore Golf Club

At the end of step two, you reached the top of your backswing. As soon, as you get there, start your downswing. As you start the downswing, make sure to remind yourself to keep your arms “connected” to your chest and shoulders. Stay connected all the way through the ball. Your hands and arms only swing as the shoulders rotate. If you start your downswing by rotating your chest, without starting to swing your arms, you will most definitely end up slicing the ball. If you swing your arms before rotating your chest, you will most likely hook the ball. Staying connected will always produce the straightest ball.

Kintore Golf Club