Kings Norton Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Kings Norton Golf Club

About Kings Norton Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Kings Norton Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Kings Norton Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Kings Norton Golf Club

Kings Norton Golf Club was founded in 1892 when David Brown, then professional at The Worcestershire, Malvern was paid the princely sum of 15 shillings to lay out a nine-hole course about a mile from Kings Norton Railway Station. Set in 300 acres of beautiful Parkland lies this majestic complex. The club has hosted various PGA Tour events and is universally accepted as one of the finest courses in the Midlands. The club is just 7 miles from the centre of Birmingham, one mile from junction 3 of the M42 and within easy reach of the National Exhibition Centre and Birmingham Airport.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

A quick review. The easiest way to roll balls at controlled speeds on your intended line is to use a True Roller. Mechanically the simplest way to swing a putter along your Aimline is to straddle the line and use a croquet-style putting stroke.

But the best legal way to putt is to take a perfectly fit putter and aim it accurately from a square setup with your feet knees hips shoulder and eye flow-lines aligned parallel-left of your Aimline; put your eyes vertically over the line and your hands vertically under your shoulders; then stroke your putt solidly on the sweetspot with a dead-hands pure-in-line stroke keeping your putterface square to the Aimline (Figure 4.13.1). In the next few chapters you ‘ll learn that if you

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 111 make this stroke in your own body rhythm following a perfect routine and ritual sequence with good touch and feel and play the correct amount of break then you’ve got it.

This pure-in-line-square putting stroke is natural works under pressure minimizes the critical nature of timing and hall position conforms 100 percent to the USGA Rules of Golf and is fundamentally simple to do. I highly recommend it!

CHAPTER 5 Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual

5.1 Controlling the Ball

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Ball-Hole Line and Target Line

When we talk about the “ball-hole” line for any putt we mean the straight line between where the ball sits (before you putt it) and the hole (Figure 4.1.2). How ever because the hole is always your ultimate target some golfers call this their

“target line.” But many golfers use “target line” to describe the line between their ball and the point at which they are aiming the line on which they hope to start the putt rolling. But you seldom try both to aim and start your ball rolling along a straight line at the hole and expect it to keep rolling on that line because most putts break at least a little bit.

Therefore it is clearer to refer to this direction as your hall-hole line. Also realize that the ball-hole line extends forever in both directions (as shown) and that it is the ball-hole line that most golfers walk to and stand on behind their ball as they first try to read the break of their putts.

Standing behind the ball trying to read the green most golfers decide how much they think the putt is going to break and then where they are going to aim. They select a point or a direction where they intend to start their putt and we refer to the line from the ball to that point or direction as the “Aimline ” or desired initial starting line of the putt (Figure 4.1.3). It’s best called the Aimline because it is the line along which you align your body feet and (it’s hoped) your stroke because you want to start the ball rolling along that line. It ‘s where you’re aiming. If everything was figured properly the ball starts on your Aimline and will roll the proper speed and break (because of the slope of the green) gently into the cup.

The entire path that your putt takes is the “ball track” (left side of Figure 4.1.4). It may remind you of the “action track” sometimes used on television to show how a ball has traveled. The distances between the balls on the track indicate how fast (relatively) the putt is traveling: Farther apart means it is rolling faster; closer together and it is rolling slower. A detailed ball track provides an accurate understanding of a putt’s entire motion – both where and how fast it was going – better even than the same putt recorded and played back on videotape.

The amount or size of the “break” played on a putt is a measure of the difference between the direction you aim and start the putt rolling and where you want it to go. We define the amount of break as the distance between the Aimline (up by the hole) and the nearest edge of the hole measured along a line between the two (right side of Figure 4.1.4). The actual amount the ball breaks (curves) is something different because the ball track ideally curves into the center of the hole. But golfers refuse to deal with that detail. When golfers say they are playing one inch of break what they mean is that their Aimline passes one inch outside the edge of the hole as shown in Figure 4.1.5. Technically they expect the putt to break 3¼ inches – one inch plus half the diameter of the hole (2½ inches) – but they insist on thinking and saying that they are playing one inch of break.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Kings Norton Golf Club

Here is a view from the front. The goal of this photo is to show that there is no lateral movement. Simply rotating your right shoulder around your spine.*Please note that you should NOT be cocking your wrists at the end of your backswing. While this may add a bit of power, it will totally throw off your timing. The results of a wrist cock are slices, hooks, fat shots, etc.

Kings Norton Golf Club